• unlimited access with print and download
    $ 37 00
  • read full document, no print or download, expires after 72 hours
    $ 4 99
More info
Unlimited access including download and printing, plus availability for reading and annotating in your in your Udini library.
  • Access to this article in your Udini library for 72 hours from purchase.
  • The article will not be available for download or print.
  • Upgrade to the full version of this document at a reduced price.
  • Your trial access payment is credited when purchasing the full version.
Buy
Continue searching

The acquisition of human B cell memory in response to Plasmodium falciparum malaria

Dissertation
Author: Greta E. Weiss
Abstract:
Immunity to Plasmodium falciparum (Pf ), the most deadly agent of malaria, is only acquired after years of repeated infections and appears to wane rapidly without ongoing exposure. Antibodies (Abs) are central to malaria immunity, yet little is known about the B-cell biology that underlies Pf -specific humoral immunity. To address this gap in our knowledge we carried out a year-long prospective study of the acquisition and maintenance of long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs) and memory B cells (MBCs) in 225 individuals aged two to twenty-five years in Mali, in an area of intense seasonal transmission. Using protein microarrays containing approximately 25% of the Pf proteome we determined that Pf -specific Abs were acquired only gradually, in a stepwise fashion over years of Pf exposure. Pf -specific Ab levels were significantly boosted each year during the transmission season but the majority of these Abs were short lived and were lost over the subsequent six month period of no transmission. Thus, we observed only an incremental increase in stable Ab levels each year, presumably reflecting the slow acquisition of LLPCs. The acquisition Pf -specific MBCs mirrored the slow step-wise acquisition of LLPCs. This slow acquisition of Pf -specific LLPCs and MBCs was in sharp contrast to that of tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific LLPCs and MBCs that were rapidly acquired and stably maintained following a single vaccination in individuals in this cohort. In addition to the development of normal MBCs we observed an expansion of atypical MBCs that are phenotypically similar to hyporesponsive FCRL4 + cells described in HIV-infected individuals. Atypical MBC expansion correlated with cumulative exposure to Pf , and with persistent asymptomatic Pf -infection in children, suggesting that the parasite may play a role in driving the expansion of atypical MBCs. Collectively, these observations provide a rare glimpse into the process of the acquisition of human B cell memory in response to infection and provide evidence for a selective deficit in the generation of Pf -specific LLPCs and MBCs during malaria. Future studies will address the mechanisms underlying the slow acquisition of LLPCs and MBCs and the generation and function of atypical MBCs.

  vi Table of Contents  List of Tables……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..xi  List of Figures …………………………………………………………………………………………………………..xii  List of Abbreviations ………………………………………………………………………………………………..xv  Chapter 1: Introduction    1.1 Overview………………………………………………………………………………..………………..1  1.2 Malaria burden and epidemiology……………………………………………….……………1  1.3 P. falciparum life cycle……………………………………………………………………………...3  1.4 Current control strategies and the need for a vaccine………………………………..5  1.5 Development of humoral memory in humans…………………………………………...7  1.6 Th e acquisition of immunity to malaria……………………………………………………12  1.7 The acquisition of antibodies and memory B cells in response to malaria..13  1.8 Hypotheses, goals and outline…………………………………………………………………19  Chapter 2: Materials and Methods  2.1 Ethics Statements  2.1.1 U.S. Vaccine trials……………………………………………………..………………22  2.1.2 U.S. blood bank samples……………………………………………………………22  2.1.3 Kambila, Mali cohort study……………………………………………..…………22  2.1.4 Zungar ococha, Peru cohort study………………………………………………23  2.2 Study sites and cohorts  2.2.1 U.S. Vaccine trials……………………………………………………..………………23  2.2.2 U.S. blood bank samples……………………………………………………………24  2.2.3 Kambila, Mali cohort study……………………..……………………..…………25  2.2.4 Zungarococha, Peru cohort study………………………………………………26    2.3 Sample collection  

  vii 2.3.1 U.S. Vaccine trials……………………………………………………..………………27  2.3.2 U.S. blood bank samples……………………………………………………………28  2.3.3 Kambila, Mali cohort study……………………………………………..…..……28  2.3.4 Zungarococha, Peru cohort study………………………………………………29    2.4 Vaccine compositions and schedules…………………………………………..…….……30  2.5 Assays and analysis  2.5.1 Research definition of malaria…………………………………………….…..…30  2.5.2 Measurement of peripheral blood Pf parasitemia……………….………31  2.5.3 Identification of RBC polymorphisms…………………………………….……31      2.5.4 St ool and urine exam for helminth infection………………………….……32  2.5.5 Geographic information system data collection…………………….……32      2.5.6 Antibody detection by ELISA………………………………………………….…..33      2.5.7 Memory B cell ELISPOT        2.5.7.1 MBC ELISPOT development………………………………………….33        2.5.7.2 Memory B cell ELISPOT assay……………………………………….35  2.5.7.3 Limiting dilution MBC ELISPOT …………………………………….37      2.5.8 Phenotypic analysis and sorting of B cell subsets………………………..39        2. 5.8.1 Conjugation of detection reagents ………………………………39  2.5.8.2 Basic B cell subset analysis…………………………………………..39  2.5.8.3 Detailed B cell subset analysis……………………………………..40        2.5.8.4 Plasma cell analysis…………………………………………….……….41        2.5.8.5 B cell subset sorting………………………………………….…………41      2.5.9 B cell fractionation……………………………………………………….…….……..41  2.5.10 Antibody profiling by protein microarray  2.5.10.1 Chip fabrication……….…………………………………….……..…..42  2.5.10.2 Ant ibody profiling………………………………………….……..……44  2.5.10.3 Data normalization procedure…………………………….….….44  2.5.10.4  Gene  ontology  and  Pf  stage‐specific  expression  analysis  of the immunogenic proteins………………………………….……45 

  viii     2.5.11 Data management and analysis…………………………………………..……46    Chapter 3: Validation and optimization of the memory B cell ELISPOT assay    3.1 Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………..……….48    3.2 Results       3.2.1 Quantifying TT‐specific MBC by flow cytometry………………………….49      3.2.2 Quantifying TT‐specific MBC by limiting dilution ELISPOT……………51      3.2.3 Increasing the efficiency of the MBC ELISPOT assay……………………51      3.2.4 Establi shing the selectivity of the modified assay for MBCs……..…52  3.2.5 Detecting Pf‐specific MBCs in individuals living in malaria endemic  areas. ………………………………………………………………………………………53    3.3 Discussion……………………………………………………………………………………………..55  Chapter 4: In malaria‐naïve individuals P. falciparum‐specific memory B cells and  antibodies develop efficiently in response to subunit vaccination with CpG as an  adjuvant    4.1 Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………….…….58    4.2 Results   4.2.1 The acquisition of MBCs in naïve individuals in response to  vaccination…………………………………………………………………………..…..60  4.2.2 The acquisition of MBCs mirro rs and predicts Ab responses in  malaria‐naïve vaccine recipients…………………………………………..……65  4.2.3 Vaccination influences MBCs and PCs independently of antigen  specificity…………………………………………………………………………..…….67    4.3 D iscussion…………………………………………………………………………………………..…69  Chapter 5: The design of the longitudinal study in Kambila, Mali and cohort  description.     5.1 Introduction……………………………………………………………….…………………..…….75    5.2 Results  5.2.1 Description of the cohort and analysis of confounding factors ….75 

  ix 5.2.2 Analysis of confounding factors…………………………………………..…..77    5.3 Discussion……………………………………………………………….……………………..…….84  Chapter 6: A prospective analysis of the antibody response to P. falciparum before and  after the malaria season by protein microarray    6.1 Introduction……………………………………………………………….………………………….87    6.2 Results   6.2.1 Validity and reproducibility of the protein microarray assay..……..88  6.2.2 Analysis of Pf‐specific antibody profiles before and after the malari a  season…………………………………………………….……………………….…...….90  6.2.3  Identifying  Pf‐specific  Ab  profiles  before  the  malaria  season  that  correlated  with  subsequent  protection  from  uncomplicated  malaria…………………………………………………….……………………….…..….96    6.3 Discussion……………………………………………………………….……………………….……100  Chapter 7: P. falciparum‐specific MBCs and Abs increase gradually over years with  cumulative exposure in an area of intense seas onal Pf transmission    7.1 Introduction…………………………..…………………………..………..…………….…………109    7.2 Results   7.2.1 Malaria immunity is acquired gradually despite intense exposure to  the Pf parasite…………………………..…………………………..………..….…..109  7.2.2 Analysis of Pf‐specific and TT‐specific MBCs and Abs in Pf‐ uninfected children and adults before the malaria season………...111  7.2.3 Longitudinal analysis of the Pf‐ and TT‐specific MBC and Ab  responses two weeks after acut e malaria and after a prolonged  period of decreased Pf exposure ……………………………………………..117  7.2.4  AMA1‐  and  MSP1‐specific  MBC  frequencies  and  Ab  levels  and  malaria risk……………………………………..………………………………….…..120    7.3 Discussion…………………………..…………………………..………..…………………….……121  Chapter 8: Atypical memory B cell expansion in individuals in the Kambila cohort    8.1 Introduction…………………………..…………………………..………..………………………131 

  x   8.2 Results   8.2.1  Atypical  MBCs  are  greatly  expanded  in  individuals  in  malaria  endemic areas……………………………………..………………………………….135  8.2.2  Class  switching  in  atypical  MBCs  in  individuals  in  malaria  endemic  areas…………………………………………………..………………………………….144  8.2.3 Longitudinal profiling of B cell subsets in children before and after  acute malaria……………………………………………….…..…………………….147    8.3 Discussion……………………………………………….…..………………………………………149  Chapter 9: Discussion……………………………………………….…..………………………………………154  Bibliography………………………………………………………………………………………………………….184 

  xi List of Tables  Table 3.1 Efficiency of MBC ELISPOT with PSC stimulation………………………………………..51  Table 4.1 Sample size and mean vaccine‐specific MBC percentage by vaccine type, CpG  group, and study day. ………………………………………………………………………………………..61  Table 5.1 Baseline clinical and demographic characteristics of entire cohort, according  to age group. ……………………………………………………………….……………………………….……76  Table 5.2 Frequency of red blood cell polymorphisms, according to age group……..….7 8  Table 5.3 Malaria outcomes for the entire cohort, by age group…………………………..….79  Table 5.4 Univariate analysis of baseline characteristics of children aged 2‐10 years,  stratified by hemoglobin (Hb) type…………………………..…………………………..………..….82  Table 6.1 Gene ontology classifications overrepresented in the immunogenic Pf  proteins relative to the entire Pf mi croarray………………………………………………………92  Table 6.2 Baseline characteristics of children aged 8‐10 years classified as susceptible  (≥1 malaria episodes) and protected (no malaria episodes) …………………………..….97  Table 6.3 Proteomic features of Pf proteins associated with protection from  uncomplicated malaria……………….…………………………..…………………………..………..….99  Table 7.1 Baseline characteristics of MBC subset by age group………………………………110  Table 7.2 Mal aria outcomes for the MBC subset, by age group…………………..…………112  Table S1. Pf proteins identified as immunogenic by protein microarray…………………171 

  xii List of Figures  Chapter 1  Figure 1.1 The Plasmodium falciparum life cycle……………………………………………………3  Figure 1.2 Clinical immunity to malaria is only acquired after repeated  infections……………………………………………………………………………………….……….12  Chapter 3  Figure 3.1 The frequency of TT‐binding MBCs in vaccinated U.S. individuals……….50  Figure 3.2 The addition of IL‐10 to PSC increased the efficiency of MBC  differentiati on to PC by 10 fold. ……………………………………………………………..52  Figure 3.3 Testing the selectivity of the PSC+IL‐10 stimulation cocktail for MBCs..53  Figure 3.4 The frequency of antigen‐specific MBCs by LD in PBMCs of Pf‐exposed  adults..…………………………………………………………………………………………………….54  Figure 3.5 Numbers of total IgG +  and antigen‐specific ASC in bulk assay cultures of  PBMC from malaria exposed adults..……………………………………………………….54  Figure 3.6 Correlations between the frequencies of antigen‐specific MBCs  determined by LD and antigen‐specific ASC by bulk assay cultures……….…55  Chapter 4  Figure 4.1 MBC are readily induced in malaria‐naive individuals upon vaccination  and CPG 7909 enhance s the kinetics and magnitude of the AMA1‐C1‐ and  MSP1 42 ‐C1‐specific MBC response to vaccination..……………………………….….62  Figure 4.2 The AMA1‐C1‐ and MSP1 42 ‐C1‐specific Ab response mirrors the  corresponding MBC response and is enhanced by CPG 7909. ……………..…..65  Figure 4.3 The level of Ag‐specific MBC at the time of booster vaccination predicts  the Ab response 14 days later……………………………………………………………..…..66  Figure 4.4 At steady‐state, levels of Ag‐specific MBC and Ab are highly  correlated……………………………………………………………….………………………..…….67  Figure 4.5 Vaccination appears to have an Ag‐independent effect on th e total IgG +   MBC pool.……………………………………………………………….…………………………......68     

  xiii Chapter 5  Figure 5.1 Number of clinical malaria episodes per day from May 2006 to Jan 2007  for the whole cohort……………………………………………………………….………….……79  Figure 5.2 Kaplan‐Meier estimates of the time from study enrollment to the first  episode of malaria in children aged 2–10 years…………………………………..……81  Figure 5.3 Distribution of study participants and sickle cell trait (HbAS) c arriers  who are study participants in the entire Kambila village population…..……83  Chapter 6  Figure 6.1 Validity and reproducibility of the protein microarray assay.………………89  Figure 6.2 Gene ontology classification of the 491 immunogenic Pf proteins…......91  Figure 6.3 Impact of age and Pf transmission on Pf‐specific Ab profiles…………...….95  Figure 6.4 Pf‐specific Ab profiles associated with protection from malaria……....…98  Chapter 7  Figure 7.1 Malaria immunity is acquired gradually despite intense exposure to th e  Pf parasite…………….……………………………………………………………….……….….… 111  Figure 7.2 The Pf‐specific MBC and long‐lived antibody compartments expand  gradually with age…………….…………………………………………………………..…..… 114  Figure 7.3 The size of the total IgG +  MBC compartment expands gradually with  age………………………………………………………………………………………………….….…116  Figure 7.4 Longitudinal analysis of the Pf‐ and TT‐specific MBC and Ab  response…………………………………………………………………………………………..…..118  Chapter 8  Figure 8.1 Flow cytometry gating strategies for B cell phenotyping……….….….…..136  Figure 8.2 Atypical MBCs are significantly increased in Malian as compared with  U.S. volunteers……………………………………………………….………………………...….137  Figure 8.3 Inhibitory and tissue‐homing receptor expression is increased and lymph  node‐homing receptor expression is decreased on atypical MBCs relative to  classical MBCs…………………………………………………………………………………..….139  Figure 8.4 At ypical MBCs increase with increased Pf transmission in individuals in  two endemic transmission settings……………………………………………………….140 

  xiv Figure 8.5 Comparison of atypical MBC percentages in Peruvian individuals  separated by reported prior Pf‐malaria……………………………………………….…141  Figure 8.6 The percent of atypical MBCs is larger in children with persistent  asymptomatic P. falciparum parasitemia as compared with parasite‐free  children……………………………………………………………………………………………….…143  Figure 8.7 The IgG expression of atypical and classical MBCs is similar……………...145  Figure 8.8 Th e percentage of IgG +  atypical MBCs increases with increased Pf  transmission in individuals in two endemic transmission settings……….…146  Figure 8.9 Acute malaria alters B cell subset composition in the periphery during  convalescence……………………………………………………………………………………….148  Figure 9.1 Model for the gradual acquisition of humoral immunity to blood stage P.  falciparum……………………………………………………………………………………………..162 

  xv List of Abbreviations  Ab    antibody  Ag    antigen  AMA1    apical membrane antigen 1 of Plasmodium falciparum  AMA1‐C1  apical membrane antigen 1 of Plasmodium falciparum clinical grade  ASC    antibody secreting cell  CIDR1 α  cysteine‐rich  interdomain  region  1α  of  the  variant  surface  antigen  of  P.  falciparum  CSP    circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium falciparum  BCR    B cell re ceptor  FCRL4    Fc receptor‐like‐4  iRBCm    infected red blood cell membrane  EBA1    erythrocyte binding antigen 1 of Plasmodium falciparum  gam    gametocyte  HIV    human immunodeficiency virus type‐1    Ig    immunoglobulin  IgD    immunoglobulin delta  IgG    immunoglobulin gamma  IgM    immunoglobulin mu  iRBC    Pf‐infected red blood cell  KLH    keyhole limpet hemocyanin  LD    limiting dilution  LLPC    long‐lived pl asma cells  LSA1    liver stage antigen 1 of Plasmodium falciparum  MBC    memory B cell 

  xvi MSP1    merozoite surface protein 1 42  of Plasmodium falciparum  MSP1 42 ‐C1  recombinant merozoite surface protein 1 42  of P. falciparum clinical grade   MSP2    merozoite surface protein 2 of Plasmodium falciparum  Mtb    Mycobacterium tuberculosis   mero    merozoite  ODN    oligodeoxynucleotide  PAMP    pattern‐associated molecular protein  PBMC    peripheral blood mononuclear cells  PC    plasma cell  PDC    plasmacytoid dendritic cell  PSC    pokeweed, SAC and CpG  PSC10    pokeweed, SAC, CpG and IL‐10  Pf    Plasmodium falciparum  Pfs260   a sexual stage antigen of Plasmodium falciparum  PfSE    Plasmodium falciparum schizont extract  RBC    red blood cell  RAP1    rhoptry‐associated protein of Plasmodium falciparum  SAC    Staphylococcus aureus Cowen  schiz    schizont  SIV    simian immunodeficiency virus  SLPC    short‐lived plasma cells  SP    sulphadoxine–pyrimethanine  spor    sporozoite  TLR    toll‐like receptor  TRAP    thrombospondin‐related adhesive protein of Plasmodium falciparum 

  xvii troph    trophozoite  TT    tetanus toxoid  TT‐b/SA‐APC  tetanus  toxoid  conjugated  to  biotin  bound  to  streptavidin‐conjugated  allophycoerythrin  VV    vaccinia virus  VZV    varicella‐zoster virus      

  1 Chapter 1: Introduction  1.1 Overview     Malaria  is  a  major  world  health  concern  today,  in  spite  of  existing  preventative  measures.  This is partially due to the failure to deliver existing anti‐malarial measures to  affected  populations,  and  partially  due  to  vector  and  parasite  escape  from  these  anti‐ malarial measures.  A vaccine is widely regarded as a critical goal in malaria‐control, but  barriers to reaching this goal include identifying immune parameters defining protection  from malari a and how these immune parameters are acquired over time in response to  natural  infection  and  determining  how  malaria  infections  might  alter  the  immune  system. Focusing on humoral immunity I present data addressing these i ssues, including:  the identification of the specificity of protective antibody (Ab)  responses (Chapter 6); a  description  of  the    development  of  Abs  and  memory  B  cells  (MBCs)    in  response    to  subunit  malaria  vaccines  in  malaria‐naïve  individuals  (Chapter  4)  in  contrast    to  the  development  of  Abs  and  MBCs  to  natural  malaria  inf ection  (Chapter  7)  and  the  discovery  of  the  presence  of  large  numbers  of  atypical  MBCs  in  individuals  in  malaria  endemic areas (Chapter 8).     1.2 Malaria burden and epidemiology   Plasmodium  falciparum  (Pf)  infections  are  the  most  deadly  of  the  four  species  that  cause  malaria  in  humans,  resulting  in  over  500  million  cases  of  malaria  and  over  one  million  deaths  annually  (157),  with  1.38  billion  people  living  in  areas  of  stable  Pf 

  2 transmission  (98).    In  addition  to  the  human  toll,  there  is  a  significant  economic  toll  in  countries  with  a  heavy malaria  burden,  as  malaria  can account  for  up  to  40%  of  public  health  expenditures,  30%  to  50%  of  inpatient  hospital  admissions,  60%  of  outpatient  health  clinic  visits  and  can  significantly  impact  the  Gross  Domestic  Product  of  affected  countries  (157).  Although  approximately  half  of  the  world’s  population,  about  four  billion peopl e, is at risk of malaria, countries in Sub‐Saharan Africa bear the brunt of the  disease,  with  approximately  90%  of  deaths  from  malaria  occurring  in  African  children  under the age of five(151).  It is esti mated that on average African children have 1.6‐5.4  episodes of malaria each year, with 20% of all childhood deaths in Africa due to malaria.   This  means  that  every  30  seconds  a  child  in  Africa  dies  of  malaria  (157).    Although  malaria  can  be  prevented  by  anti‐malarial  prophylaxis  and  uncomplicated  mala ria  is  curable  with  anti‐malarial  drugs,  the  infrastructure  is  not  in  place  to  deliver  anti‐ malarials  to  affected  populations.    In  addition,  Pf‐drug  resistance  inevitably  emerges  creating a constant demand for new drugs. Similarly, insecticides and insecticide‐treated  bed nets can be effective control measures but again the infrastructure is not in plac e to  provide  these  consistently  to  all  individuals  at  risk,  and  there  is  the  predictable  emergence  of  Anopheles  insecticide  resistance.  Malaria  disproportionately  affects  impoverished people in rural areas who either cannot afford treatment or have limited  access,  or  a  complete  lack  of  access  to  health  care.  Thus,  in  addition  to  anti‐mal arial  drugs and insecticides, a malaria vaccine is widely viewed as a priority in the control of  malaria. 

  3 1.3 P. falciparum life cycle    The  Pf‐life  cycle  within  the  human  host  is  complex  and  tightly  regulated.    Pf  is  transmitted by the infected female Anopheles mosquito, which transfers a small number  Pf  sporozoites  from  her  salivary  glands  to  the  human  (Fig  1.2,  A)  as  she  takes  a  blood  meal.  Upon contact with human skin the sporozoites travel to the draining lymph node  where CD8+ T cells are primed (37) (B(a)).  Sporozoites also burrow through tissue until  reaching th e bloodstream, which carries them to the liver (B(b)).  Once inside the liver,  sporozoites  invade  hepatocytes  where  they  expand  dramatically  in  a  clinically  silent  stage  of  infection,  with  each  sporozoite  giving  rise  to  tens  of  thousands  of  merozoites.   At  this  point  the  parasites  lyse  the  hepatocytes,  leaving  the  liver  clear  of  s porozoites,  and enter the blood stage of infection as greatly expanded numbers of merozoites (C).    

  4 During  this  stage  of  infection  the  parasites  invade  erythrocytes,  where  they  digest  hemoglobin  for  energy  to  replicate,  then  lyse  their  host  erythrocytes  and  invade  new  erythrocytes,  replicating  exponentially  in  a  48  hour  cycle  (D).    The  blood  stage  is  the  symptomatic stage of infection typically causing headache, chills, sweating, and fever in  uncomplicated  malaria.  During  the  blood  stag e  of  infection  in  a  poorly  understood  process  male  and  female  gametocytes  form  (E),  which  are  taken  up  by  a  mosquito  during a blood meal (F).  The gametocytes join in the mosquito midgut (G), differentiate  into  haploid  sporozoites  which  travel  to  the  mosquito’s  salivary  glands  and  are  transferred  to  another  human  during  a  blood  meal  (H )  to  complete  the  parasite’s  life‐ cycle (192).     A number of features of the parasite’s life cycle within the human host appear to  have evolved to evade the immune system.  Firstly, only a small number of sporozoites  are initially introduced into the host (as few as ten to fifteen sporozoites).  The transport  of  merozoites  from  the  liver  to  the  bloodstream  is  acco mplished  inside  hepatocyte‐ membrane  derived  vesicles,  in  which  the  parasite  inhibits  the  exposure  of  phosphatidylserine  (181)  which  is  thought  to  have  a  role  in  mediating  phagocytosis  through  protein  kinase  C  activation  (128).    Thus,  the  parasite  avoids  antigen  exposure,  both  by  keeping  contained  within  host  membrane,  and  by  controlling,  to  some  ext ent,  the  composition  of  that  membrane,  decreasing  the  risk  of  phagocytosis.    Merozoites  invade and replicate inside erythrocytes, which lack MHC class I allowing parasitized red  cells  to  evade  CD8  T  cell  recognition.    Merozoites  also  use  multiple  invasion  pathways 

  5 mediated by multiple different receptors such that Ab responses to any one receptor do  not  block  invasion  (43,  189).    Pf‐infected  red  blood  cells  (iRBC)  express  the  Pf  protein  PfEMP1 on their surface, allowing iRBC to sequester to blood vessel endothelium in the  heart,  brain,  lung,  kidney,  subcutaneous  tissue,  and  sometimes  placenta,  thus  evadin g  clearance  by  the  spleen.      PfEMP1s  are  encoded  by  the  var  gene  family  which  has  ~60  members,  and  although  most  parasites  during  an  infection  will  express  the  same  var  gene product, the predominantly expressed PfEMP1 can change rapidly during infection,  assisting  iRBC  in  evading  detection  by  the  immune  system  (review ed  in  (189)).    The  individual  and  cumulative  effects  of  these  mechanisms  on  the  development  of  immunological memory to Pf are not fully known.   1.4 Current control strategies and the need for a vaccine    Current  malaria  control  strategies  depend  on  use  of  insecticides  and  drug  therapies  both  as  a  prophylaxis  and  as  treatment  for  infection,  but  the  difficulty  in  expanding  the se  measures  to  all  malaria‐endemic  areas  and  maintaining  this  coverage  as  well  as  the  growing  resistance  to  these  protective  measures  highlights  the  need  for  vaccine development. Both vector control and anti‐parasite drug therapy are limited by  the  acquired  resistance  of  mosquit o  to  insecticides  and  parasites  to  antimalarials  in  addition to the inadequate infrastructure to implement these measures.  Vector control  includes  indoor  residual  spraying  (IRS)  with  insecticides  including  DDT  and  use  of  long‐ lasting  insecticide‐treated  bed‐nets  (LLINs).  Drug  therapies  involve  mass  drug  administration (MDA) and intermittent preventive therapy (IPT)(75).   

  6 Mosquitoes  and  Pf  parasites  have  both  developed  resistance  to  the  respective  treatments and resistance has spread rapidly and widely.  DDT resistance developed less  than two  years after its introduction and now a number of mutations causing resistance  through multiple mechanisms have been observed in the Middle East, India, Southeast  and Central Asia, South‐Ameri ca and Africa (75), in more than 50 species of Anophiline  mosquitoes(99).  In addition, other health risks of DDT must be considered (reviewed in  (195)).    On  the  front  of  drug  therapies,  Pf  has  rapidly  developed  resistance  to  quinine,  chloroquine,  amodiaquine,  sulphadoxine–pyrimethanine  (SP),  and  may  have  acquired  resistance  to  artemisinin  (109).    As  an  illustration  of  the  r apidity  of  the  acquisition  of  drug resistance in some cases, SP had a useful life of only five years in Thailand (178).  Pf  resistant to SP, originally reported in southeast Asia and South America, quickly spread  to east and central Africa in the mid 1990’s (126), chloroquine resistant Pf has spread to  almost all malar ia‐endemic countries, and by 2001 choloroquine resistant Pf accounted  for 25%‐50% of all malaria cases in Africa (9), and multidrug resistant Pf has emerged in  some areas, notably southeast Asia (204).  A 12 year study in Papua New Guinea fo und  that  while  using  combinations  of  drugs  increases  clinical  effectiveness,  it  does  not  decelerate growth of drug resistance (153). Thus, the difficulty in delivering insecticides  or  antimalarials  to  affected  populations,  the  emergence  of  mosquitoes  resistant  to  insecticides and increasing drug resistance in Pf highlight the importance of developing  a vaccine.     

  7 1.5 Development of humoral memory in humans    The  phenomenon  of  immunological  memory  is  a  fundamental  property  of  the  adaptive  immune  system  and  is  the  basis  for  all  vaccine  development.    For  most  vaccines, neutralizing Abs play a critical role in protective immune responses (161), and  thus  understanding  the  mechanisms  that  underlie  the  ge neration  and  maintenance  of  humoral  memory  is  of  great  importance.    Long‐term  humoral  immunity  is  encoded  in  MBCs and long‐lived plasma cells (LLPCs) that are generated during the primary immune  response in germinal center reactions (46, 47, 130).  LLPCs are terminally differentiated  cells that reside in the bone marrow constitutively secreting Ab and thus are responsible  for  the  long‐term  maintenance  of  se rum  Ab  levels  which  provide  a  critical  first  line  of  defense against reinfection (87).  MBCs express somatically hyper‐mutated and isotype  switched  B  cell  receptors  (BCRs)  and  mediate  recall  responses  to  reinfection  by  proliferating and differentiating into plasma cell s (PCs) resulting in rapid, high‐titer, high  affinity secondary Ab responses.  Despite the central role of MBCs in protective immune  responses,  little  is  understood  about  how  they  are  acquired  in  naïve  individuals  in  response  to  antigen  exposure  and  what  factors  influence  this  process.    Efforts  to  develop  new  vaccines  would  benefit  from  a  more  detailed  kn owledge  of  the  mechanisms underlying the acquisition of these cells.  Although the longevity of PCs and MBCs is a central feature of humoral memory,  our  understanding  of  the  mechanisms  that  underlie  the  maintenance  of  these  cell  populations for the lifetime of an individual is only partial. The long‐lived nature of LLPCs 

  8 in  humans  has  been  inferred  from  the  stability  of  serum  Ab  levels  induced  by  vaccination  or  infection.    Virus‐specific  Ab  levels  were  shown  to  be  maintained  for  longer than 60 years after smallpox vaccination (48, 73, 95, 135), and the reported half‐ lives  of  Ab  responses  following  infection  ranges from  50  yea rs  for  varicella‐zoster  virus  (VZV) to over 200 years for measles and mumps viruses (12).  These vaccines also induce  stable, long‐lasting Ab levels in the majority of individuals vaccinated, for example, more  than  90%  of  those  vaccinated  25‐75  years  prior  to  testing  had  substantial  immunity  to  vaccinia  (95).    Typically,  for  the  live‐attenuated  vaccines,  vaccination  cause s  a  spike  in  Ab titers followed by a decrease in titers over one to three years, after which Ab titers  remain  relatively  constant.  For  some  vaccines  Ab  levels  continue  to  decline  but  at  a  much slower pace, over decades with a half‐lif e closer to ten to twenty years, as in the  case of tetanus and diphtheria vaccination (46, 48, 73).   It  remains  an  open  question  as  to  whether  LLPCs  are  inherently  long‐lived  or  whether LLPCs are replenished by MBCs that proliferate and differentiate in response to  persistent  (216)  or  intermittent  exposure  to  an tigen,  and/or  through  non‐specific  by‐ stander  activation  (e.g.  cytokines  or  TLR  ligands)  (30).  Based  on  data  from  humans,  it  seems  likely  that  LLPCs  are  long‐lived  as  Ab  titers  to  tetanus,  measles,  mumps  and  rubella  have  been  shown  to  persist  at  protective  levels  for  years  after  rituximab  treatment,  which  depletes  CD20 +   cells,  thus  depleting  naïve  B  cells  and  MBCs  without  depleting  PCs  (121),  suggesting  that  MBC  contributions  to  LLPC  persistence  are  slight  over  time.    As  we  might  expect  since  MBCs  differentiate  into  PCs,  accounting  for  the 

  9 high  titers  of  short‐lived  Abs  during  recall  responses,  recall  responses  after  rituximab  treatment  are  inhibited  in  both  non‐human  primates  (86)  and  in  humans  (196).    The  correlation observed between tetanus‐, measles‐, smallpox‐, anthrax‐, hepatitis B‐, and  rotavirus‐specific  MBCs  and  their  respective  Ab  levels  at  steady  state  suggests  that  MBCs  are  ultimately  re sponsible  for  replenishing  PCs  (30,  48,  64,  137,  165).    Antigen‐ specific MBC levels and Ab titers were also shown to correlate after acute infection with  measles, mumps and rubella, but not vaccinia (12).  The story is not completely clear‐cut  however  as  MBC  levels  and  Ab  titers  did  no t  correlate  in  other  studies  for  hepatitis  B  (199), varicella‐zoster virus, EBV, tetanus and diphtheria (12).    Another  key  question  is  the  role  of  antigen  exposure  in  maintaining  immunological memory in humans throughout the human life‐span.   MBCs specific for  several  pathogens  after  vaccination  have  been  found  to  be  rema rkably  stable  in  the  absence  of  antigen  exposure  and  the  role  of  attenuated  live  or  inactivated  vaccine  formulation  is  not  entirely  clear  either  with  regard  to  the  ability  to  induce  long  term  immunity  or  MBCs.    MBCs  specific  for  pathogens  following  vaccination  with  live  attenuated  vaccines  including  vaccinia,  measles,  mumps  and  rubella,    and  inactiv ated  vaccines  including  diphtheria,  and  tetanus  as  well  as  Epstein‐Barr  virus  and  varicella‐ zoster  virus  infection,  were  found  to  be  remarkably  stable  in  a  recent  cross‐sectional  analysis  of  adults  (12).    Inactivated  tetanus  and  diphtheria  vaccines  induced  shorter‐ lived  antibody  responses,  however,  the  pathogen  for  which  there  was  the  most  evidenc e for re‐exposure to antigen following vaccination, varicella‐zoster virus, had the 

  10 shortest‐lived  antibody  response  of  the  viruses  studied.    Interestingly,  in  the  case  of  cholera  the  inactivated  oral  vaccine  Dukoral®  was  shown  to  be  effective  at  preventing  severe diarrhea in large field trials in Bangladesh (40, 41), while the live attenuated oral  cholera  vaccine  Orochol®  did  not  show  significant  protection  in  a  large  field  trial  in  Indonesia  (167).    Ther e  are  several  examples  of  the  maintenance  of  Ab‐mediated  immunity  in  the  absence  of  antigen  exposure  including  immunity  to  measles  on  the  Faroe Islands, yellow fever in the U.S., polio in remote Eskimo villages (reviewed in (46)),  as  well  as  the  detection  of  antigen‐specific  MB Cs  more  than  50  years  after  smallpox  vaccination  (48).  Vaccinia‐specific  MBCs  were  detected  over  50  years  after  smallpox  vaccination  and  represented  approximately  0.1%  of  total  circulating  MBCs,  remaining  unchanged at this percentage from 20 to 60 years post vaccination (48).  The presence  of  these  MBCs  was  correlated  with  a  robust  reca ll  Ab  response  upon  re‐vaccination.   Unlike  PCs,  which  are  terminally‐differentiated,  MBCs  may  be  maintained  through  homeostatic proliferation (133), possibly through exposure to polyclonal stimuli (30).  Our  current  understanding  of  the  acquisition  of  B  cell  immunity  in  humans  is  largely  derived  from  studies  of  humans  after  vaccination  due  in  large  part  to  the  difficulty in studying natural infectio ns in humans when we cannot predict who within a  population will be infected with a given pathogen at a given time.   Although much can  be  learned  from  studies  of  the  response  to  vaccination,  the  relative  complexity  of  infection,  where  immune  cells  are  typically  stimulated  by  a  panoply  of  PAMPs  and  multiple  ant igens  and  exposed  to  infected  cells  and  the  by‐products  of  dead  infected 

  11 cells,  could  significantly  impact  the  development  of  immunity.  Knowledge  of  the  individual  and  cumulative  effects  of  signaling  through  various  receptors,  antigen  load  and  persistence,  the  cell  types  activated  and  the  outcome  of  this  activation  on  B  cell  differentiation in infection in response to various pathogens would give a much greater  understanding  of  the  requirements  for  or  detriments  to  inducing  long  lived  memory.   While we still do not understand the factors that contribute to determining long‐ versus  short‐lived  Ab  responses,  studying  the  response  to  vaccines  allows  us  to  gain  some  understanding  of  the  dev elopment  of  long‐lived  MBCs  and  LLPCs.    However,  studying  the  differen ces  between  the  responses  to  vaccines  and  those  induced  by  infections  could provide valuable information on the elements important for the induction of long‐ lived humoral immunity. Thus far, only three studies have analyzed the progression of a  humoral  response  after  infection  and  these  were  in  individuals  who  presented  with  acute  Vibrio  cholerae  infe ction,  a  pathogen  that  elicits  long‐term  protection  against  subsequent disease in endemic areas, and found in the majority of patients, IgA and IgG  MBCs  specific  for  two  antigens;  cholera  toxin  B  and  toxin‐co‐regulated  pilus  major  subunit A, increase from day two to thirty, and remain stable at this level for one year  with no contraction (97, 112, 120). As will be shown in Chapter 7, this rapid acquisition  of  stable  B  cell  immunity  differs  dramatical ly  from  that  observed  in  malaria  infections.  Since at this point even some of the most basic questions surrounding the development  of  long‐live d  humoral  immunity  have  not  been  addressed,  I  feel  that  studying  the  outcome  in  a  highly  complex  disease  such  as  malaria  could  ultimately  offer  important 

  12 insights  into  the  factors  that  determine  long‐lived  humoral  memory.    The  study  in  Kambila presented here is the first prospective longitudinal study of MBC development  in response to any natural infection.    1.6 The acquisition of immunity to malaria  Clinical  immunity  to  Pf  malaria  develops  gradually  over  years  of  repeated  exposures.    It  is  well  known  in  medium  to  high  transmission  areas  tha t  malaria  is  a  disease  of  children  and  pregnant  women.    Infants  begin  to  get  malaria  around  six  months  of  age  when  maternal  Abs  start  to  wane,  and  during  the  first  few  years  of  life  are  at  the  greatest  risk  of  severe  malaria,  manife sted  as  severe  anemia,  acidosis  or  cerebral malaria.  Children remain susceptible to uncomplicated malaria until about ten  years of age, and adults remain susceptible to asymptomatic parasitemia throughout life  (Fig  1.2).  Although  some  partially‐immune  adults  do  have  malaria  episodes,  these  are   

  13 typically less severe and less frequent than episodes in children.  In addition, adults who  have  achieved  clinical  immunity  to  Pf  malaria  who  migrate  to  non‐endemic  areas  have  been empirically observed to become clinically susceptible after a one to two year time  period.  Sterile immunity to Pf has not been documented f ollowing natural exposure to  the  parasite.  The  pathologies  and  symptoms  of  severe  malaria  and  uncomplicated  malaria  are  different  and  resistance  to  these  disease  states  is  likely  mediated  via  different immune mechanisms. My thesis will focus on the acquisition of B cell immunity  to uncomplicated malaria.   1.7 The acquisition of Abs and MBCs in response to malaria  In  1961  Cohen  et  al.  (42)  conducted  a  study  in  humans,  passively  transferring  purified  IgG  from  malaria  immune Gambian  adults  to  children  with  severe  malaria.    As  controls they gave children no treatment, IgG purified from malaria‐naïve donors in the  UK,  or  IgG‐free  serum  fr om  Gambian  adults.    No  anti‐malarial  drugs  were  given  and  fever and parasitemia were monitored.   Fever and parasitemia decreased dramatically  in  those  given  IgG  from  malaria‐immune  adults,  while  parasitemia  decreased  only  slightly  and  insignificantly  in  all  other  groups  of  children,  giving  the  first  conclusive  evidence that Abs play a key role in protection fro m malaria (42).  Two human adoptive  transfer studies followed in 1962 (67), and in 1963 where IgG from West African adults  was  given  to  East  African  children,  and  a  fourth  study  30  years  after  the  initial  manuscript,  in  1991  (170)  where  West  Afri can  IgG  was  given  to  Thai  patients.    In  all  cases,  regardless  of  the  geographical  location  or  age  of  the  patients,  parasitemia  and 

  14 malaria  symptoms  decreased,  and  in  the  most  recent  study  it  was  shown  that  parasitemia  decreased  as  rapidly  in  IgG  treated  patients  as  it  did  in  drug‐treated  patients (170).   Several  studies  indicate  that  Abs  specific  for  Pf  proteins  are  generated  inefficiently  and  inconsistently  and  lost  rapidly  in  the  absence  of  ongoing  exposure  to  the  parasite  (r eviewed  in  (129)).        Many  studies  report  Ab  titers  to  Pf  antigens  in  the  days  following  malaria,  but  this  Ab  decreases  in  titer  rapidly  to  the  point  of  being  undetectable in plasma weeks after malaria, suggesting that the entirety of, or the vast  majority  of,  these  Ab  responses  are  due  to  SL PCs  rather  than  LLPCs.    A  study  in  Kenya  measured  IgG  to  five  Pf  antigens,  MSP1 19 ,  MSP2  type  1,  MSP2  type  2,  EBA175,  and  AMA1, and showed that the half‐lives of these responses were 9.8 days for IgG1 and 6.1  days  for  IgG3,  regardless  of  antigen  specificity,  with  Abs  undetectable  or  nearly  undetectable in individuals at six weeks (122).  A four‐year study in Sudan showed that  Pf‐RAP1  Ab  was  detectable  only  during  and  immediat ely  after  malaria  infections  and  measureable  Abs  lasted  only  one  to  two  months,  although  within  an  individual,  responses  increased  in  magnitude  with  repeated  infections,  suggesting  a  memory  component  (82).    A  study  in  The  Gambia  reported  half‐lives  of  39.4  days  for  IgG1  and  32.6 days for IgG3 fo r Pf‐AMA1 and Pf‐MSP2, and further showed that Abs of these two  specificities  declined  more  slowly  in  children  with  persistent  parasitemia,  and  in  older  versus  younger  children,  with  children  four  to  six  having  mean  half‐lives  of  52  and  47  days  for  IgG1  and  IgG3  respect ively,  and  children  aged  three  and  older  having  a  mean 

  15 half‐life  of  16  days  for  both  isotypes  for  both  antigens  (8).    The  rapid  decline  of  Pf‐ specific Abs described in some studies may be explained by extrapolating the kinetics of  Ab titers observed in vaccine trials where antigen‐specific Ab levels rapidly increase and  then  rapidly  decrease  following  immunization,  as  the  subjects  in  th ese  studies  were  assayed  immediately  following  malaria  (8,  122).    However,  the  repeated  reappearance  and  complete  disappearance  of  Ab‐reactivity  in  the  plasma  of  individuals  (36,  82,  188,  193) cannot yet be explained.  These studies suggest that only short‐lived Ab responses  rather  than  long‐lived  Ab  responses  are  gen erated  following  some  infections.    In  one  longitudinal  study  only  50%  of  adults  had  AMA1‐specific  Ab  at  any  one  of  three  timepoints  tested  and  only  11%  had  Ab  at  all  three  timepoints  tested  (193).    The  percentage of adults  in malaria endemic areas that have measureable Ab responses to  those  Pf  antigens  that  have  been  te sted  after  years  of  malaria  exposure  is  also  lower  than would be expected based on vaccine studies, measured at 3‐15% for MSP2 (207),  9‐10% (207) and 58‐66% for CSP (114), 20% for Pfs260 (188), 29‐32% for RAP1 (82), 13‐ 54%  for  PfSE  (207),  19‐41%  for  LSA 1  (114),  61‐64%  for  TRAP  (114),  38%  (188),  13‐48%  (207),  40%  (68)  and  ~75%  (152)  for  MSP1 19,  70‐75%  for  EBA1  (152),  11‐50%  (193),  23‐ 37%  (207)  and  ~90%  for  AMA1  (162).    The  low  percentage  of  adults  with  positive  Ab  titers  along  with  the  observation  that  the  Ab  titer  measured  both  increased  with  age,  comparing  adults  ≤40  versus  >40,  and  Pf  transmission  (152),  indicate  that  even  in  individuals  with  decades  of  exposure  to  Pf,  acquisition  of  stable  long‐lived  Ab  lev els  is  remarkably slow.   

  16 Pf‐specific  MBCs  have  been  measured  in  only  two  studies  to  date,  and  both  indicate defects in MBC development.  One study (64) reported that the percentage of  adults  with  detectable  antigen‐specific  MBCs  was  46%  for  AMA1,  36%  for  MSP1 19   and  64%  for  CIDR1α,  compared  to  71%  for  tetanus.    Interestingly,  children  five  months  to  nine years of age had comparable levels of MBCs to AMA1 and MSP1 and only differed  for  CIDR1α,  where  21%  of  children  had  detectable  MBCs.    Children  aged  five  months  and  adults  had  comparable  numbers  of  Pf‐specific  MBCs  and  comparable  but  higher  levels  of  tetanus‐specific  MBCs  suggesting  that  there  ma y  be  a  limit  to  the  size  of  the  antigen‐specific  niche  that  cannot  be  overcome  with  repeated  exposure.    However  these  data  are  difficult  to  interpret  as  the  sample  numbers  were  quite  low,  with  15  adults  and  an  average  of  six  children  per  year  of  age  stu died.  It  is  also  difficult  to  compare  these  results  with  others  in  the  literature  as  the  MBC  frequency  was  determined by a poisson distribution calculation based on the proportion of an average  of  six  wells/sample  which  were  positive,  the  translation  of  which  to  a  direct  fr equency  or  percent  is  not  entirely  clear.    In  addition,  the  study  was  cross‐sectional  and  parasitemic and aparasitemic individuals were analyzed as a group.  If Pf‐specific MBCs  have some defect in maintenance, and are only observed transiently following infection  as  are  Pf‐specific  Ab  ti ters  in  some  studies,  analyzing  parasitemic  and  aparasitemic  individuals  together  could  obfuscate  age‐related  differences  in  MBC  levels.    Pf‐specific  MBCs and Ab titers were found to correlate, but for AMA1 and CIDR1α antigens, more  individuals  had  Ab  with  no  detectable  MBCs  than  in  the  case  of  tetanus  (64).    In  the 

  17 second  study  of  Pf‐specific  MBCs,  adults  in  a  malaria  endemic  area  were  compared  to  those  in  the  same  city  who  had  had  a  recent  known  episode  of  Pf‐malaria,  with  the  percentage  positive  for  MBCs  to  each  antigen  given  for  these  two  groups  respectively;  for AMA1 14.2% and 48%, for MSP1 19  14.2% and 33%, for MSP2 4.8% and 18%, and for  CSP 0% and 1% (207).  In this study no correlation was observed between MBCs and Ab  titers.  Again these data should be considered carefully, as the study was small, the time  from  the  last  Pf  infection  was  not  stringently  known  and  groups  were  designated  by  a  combination of volunte er‐recalled malaria, seropositivity to schizont extract (PfSE), and  prior  recorded  episodes  of  either  P.  vivax  or  P.  falciparum.    The  failure to  differentiate  between  prior  P.  vivax  and  P.  falciparum  infections,  and,  possibly  even  more  critically,  defining  individuals  as  “recently  exposed”  based  on  seropositivity  rath er  than  documented recent exposure could bias the results.  Collectively these data indicate an  inefficient  acquisition  of  Ab  and  MBC  responses  to  Pf‐malaria.    Elucidating  the  cellular  basis of the inefficient acquisition of malaria immunity and Pf‐specific Ab responses may  ultimately prove critical to the design of an effective malaria vaccine.   While Ab to several individual antigens confers protection in animal mode ls, Ab  reactivity  to  any  single Pf  antigen  has  not  been  conclusively  correlated  with  protection  in humans, and considering the complexity of the parasite’s life cycle within the host, it  is  likely  that  Abs  to  multiple  Pf  antigens  will  be  required  to  induce  clinical  immunity.   One possibility is th at immunity requires Abs to all of the PfEMP1 gene products of the  ~60 members of the var gene family which Pf causes the expression of on infected red 

  18 blood cells (iRBC).  Although most parasites during an infection will express the same var  gene product, the predominantly expressed PfEMP1 can change rapidly during infection,  thus  evading  elimination  of  iRBCs  mediated  by  Abs  to  other  PfEMP1’s  (reviewed  in  (189)).    By  this  hypothesis,  the  slow  development  of  immunity  is  due  to  the  length  of  time  required  to  expose  individuals  to  all  the  various  var  gene  products  and  recu rrent  infections  are  due  to  iRBC  expressing  PfEMP1’s  unfamiliar  to  that  host.    In  addition  to  var genes, Pf has extensive genetic diversity, with nearly as many alleles of some genes  reported  as  there  are  gene  sequences,  and  a  related  hy pothesis  on  the  delay  of  acquisition  of  immunity  is  based  on  the  length  of  time  required  to  develop  Abs  to  the  wide  natural  genetic  diversity  (186).    It  has  also  been  suggested  that  the  difficulty  in  developing  immunity  to  Pf  could  be  a  property  of  some  Pf  antigens  themselves,  ei ther  by  inhibition  of  CD4  T  cell  activation  (132),  or  by  the  presence  of  disulfide  bonds  that  impede  efficient  antigen  processing  (100).  Subunit  Pf  protein  vaccines  would  allow  the  assessment of the ability of Pf antigens alone to induce MBCs independent of the effects  of other Pf antigens and the compl ex effects of Pf infection.  It would also be critical to  test  these  subunit  vaccines  in  malaria‐naïve  individuals  who  would  not  have  had  the  opportunity  to  develop  lasting  immune  modulation  of  the  response  to  these  antigens,  as it is well known that preexisting immune reactions affect recall responses.  Thus, by  using subuni t vaccines in malaria‐naïve individuals we can explore this possibility.   In summary,  as a result of the studies in Pf‐specific Ab longevity, the delay in the  development  of  immunity,  and  the  renewed  susceptibility  to  clinical  infection  of 

  19 previously  immune  individuals  who  return  to  endemic  areas,  there  has  been  doubt  in  the  malaria  research  community  as  to  whether  true  immunologic  memory  to  Pf  develops  or  can  be  maintained.    These  are  some  of  the  central  questions  that  we  explore here.  1.8 Hypotheses, goals and outline    Our goals in these studies are to assess the ability of two bl ood stage Pf vaccine  candidates  to  induce  Pf‐specific  Abs  and  MBCs  in  malaria‐naïve  individuals  in  the  context  of  vaccination,  and  in  children  in  a  malaria  endemic  area  in  the  context  of  Pf  infection.    As  a  control  antigen,  to  assess  the  effects  of  Pf  infectio n  as  well  as  the  development  and  maintenance  of  a  non‐Pf‐related  antigen  in  this  population  we  will  assess the Ab and MBC responses to tetanus vaccination.  In addition we will analyze B  cells  for  phenotypic  changes  associated  with  malaria  by  flow  cytometry.    In  order  to  address  the  specificit y  of  protective  Ab  responses,  we  will  probe  plasma  samples  by  protein microarray to determine whether Ab reactivity to some antigens correlates with  subsequent protection from clinical malaria, and to test this protein microarray platform  as a way to identify protective Ab specificities.  Based on the observed delay in the development of immunity to Pf‐ma laria, the  apparently  short‐lived  nature  of  immunity  to  clinical  Pf‐malaria,  the  serology  data  indicating  that  Ab  responses  to  Pf  proteins  are  inconsistently  generated,  the  rapid  decrease  in  immunity  in  the  absence  of  exposure,  and  the  incredibly  complex  immune  environment  induced  during  Pf‐malaria,  we  hypothesize  that  the  MBC  response  to  Pf 

  20 infection will be significantly impaired relative to that of tetanus vaccination within the  same population, and/or relative to the response in malaria‐naïve individuals vaccinated  with Pf‐antigens.  We hypothesize that the MBC response in malaria exposed individuals  will  be  either  of  decreased  magnitude,  inconsistently  present  within  an  individual,  or  inconsistently  generated  across  individuals.    In  spite  of  the  proposed  idea  that  Pf‐ malaria  ca n  suppress  non‐related  immune  responses,  we  hypothesize  that  TT  vaccination will likely have induced a relatively robust response in our Malian cohort, as  it is unlikely that many individuals were infected with Pf at the time of vaccination, and  there  is  lit tle  data  to  support  a  malaria‐induced  long‐lasting  general  immune‐ suppression.    We do not hypothesize that we will see a correlation between AMA1‐ or MSP1‐ specific  MBCs  and  malaria  risk,  as  recent  clinical  trials  showed  that  vaccination  with  either  AMA1  or  MSP1  did  not  confer  protection  (156,  171).    Furthermore,  we  su spect  that the frequency of MBCs per se may not reliably predict clinical immunity to malaria  regardless  of  antigen  specificity,  but  MBCs  to  protective  antigens  might  predict  future  Ab  titers  that  would  be  protective.    This  is  based  on  the  kinetics  of  Pf  blood‐stage  infection,  where  symptoms  can  begin  as  earl y  as  three  days  after  the  blood  stage  infection  begins  (179),  while  the  differentiation  of  MBCs  into  PCs  peaks  approximately  six  to  eight  days  after  re‐exposure  to  antigen  (30).    Thus  there  may  not  be  sufficient  time for MBCs specific for Pf blood stage antigens to differentiate into the Ab‐secreting  cells  such  that  existing  MBCs  could  prevent  the  onset  of  malaria  symptoms.    Based  on 

  21 the  delay  in  acquisition  of  immunity  and  the  data  indicating  defective  Ab  and  MBC  responses to Pf we hypothesize that there will be malaria‐related phenotypic changes in  B  cells.    We  also  hypothesize  that  a  pattern  of  Ab  reactivity  to  certain  Pf  antigens  will  correlate with subsequent protection from clinical malaria.  The  data  I  present  here  address  these  questions  and  hypotheses.    These  data  indicate an efficient dev elopment of Ab and MBCs to Pf antigens in response to subunit  malaria  vaccines  in  malaria‐naïve  individuals.    This  contrasts  to  the  incremental,  stepwise development of Abs and MBCs to the same Pf antigens in response to na tural  malaria infection.   Further, all malaria‐naive vaccinees had detectable Pf‐specific MBCs  following vaccination, while approximately half of adults with a lifetime of exposure to  the  antigens  had  detectable  Pf‐specific  MBCs.    The  incremental  development  of  Pf‐ specific  MBCs  also  contrasted  with  the  efficient  and  stable  development  of  TT‐specific  Abs and MBCs in the malar ia‐exposed individuals.  Potentially related to the inefficient  development of Pf‐specific Abs and MBCs, we identified an expansion of atypical MBCs  phenotypically similar to the hyporesponsive FCRL4 +  MBCs which are similarly expanded  in  HIV  patients.    We  also  present  a  potential  method  of  identifying  the  specificity  of  protective  Ab  responses,  and  identify  49  proteins  to  which  higher  antibody  titer  correlated  with  subsequent  protection  from  malaria.    While  certain  Ab  specificities  correlated  with  protection,  MBCs  to  the  two  Pf  antigens  we  tested  di d  not  correlate  with protection, as predicted.  Overall these observations give the first glimpse into the 

  22 development  of  humoral  memory  to  Pf  malaria  and  raise  important  questions  for  further research.  Chapter 2: Materials and Methods  2.1 Ethics Statements  2.1.1 U.S. Vaccine trials  Both the AMA1 and MSP1 vaccine trials were conducted under Investigational New Drug  Applications  reviewed  by  the  U.S.  Food  and  Drug  Administration,  and  both  were  review ed  and  approved  by  the  National  Institute  of  Allergy  and  Infectious  Diseases  Institutional  Review  Board  and  by  the  Institutional  Review  Boards  at  their  respective  sites  and  funding  agencies.  Written  informed  consent  was  obtained  from  all  participants.  2.1.2 U.S. blood bank samples  Blood  samples  were  obtained  for  research  use  by  signed  consent  of  th e  donors  under  approved human subjects protocol Institutional Review Board (IRB) no. 99‐CC‐0168.  2.1.3 Kambila, Mali cohort study  The  ethics  committee  of  the  Faculty  of  Medicine,  Pharmacy,  and  Odonto‐Stomatology,  and  the  institutional  review  board  at  the  National  Institute  of  Allergy  and  Infectious  Diseases, National Institutes of Heal th approved this study (NIAID protocol number 06‐I‐

  23 N147).  Written,  informed  consent  was  obtained  from  adult  participants  and  from  the  parents  or  guardians  of  participating  children.  The  study  was  externally  monitored  by  international monitors under contract with NIAID, in compliance with the International  Conference on Harmonization Good Clinical Practices (ICH/GCP), 1) to verify the prompt  reporting  of  all  data  points,  including  reporting  severe  adverse  events,  checking  availability  of  signed  informed  consents;  2)  to  compare  individual  subject  records  and  the  source  documents  (supporting  data,  laboratory  speci men  records  and  medical  records  to  include  physician  progress  notes,  nurse’  notes,  subjects’  hospital  charts);  3)  to ensure protection of study subjects, compliance with the protocol, and accura cy and  completeness of records.  The monitors also will inspect the clinical site regulatory files  to ensure that regulatory requirements are being followed.    2.1.4 Zungarococha, Peru cohort study  Ethical clearance for this study was received from New York University, the University of  Alabama,  and  the  Peruvian  Ministry  of  Health  National  Institute  of  Health  Internal  Ethical  Revi ew  Boards.  All  individuals  enrolled  in  this  study  gave  signed  informed  consent.  2.2 Study sites and cohorts  2.2.1 U.S. Vaccine trials 

  24 Malaria‐naive  adults  (n=40)  residing  in  the  U.S.  were  enrolled  in  two  separate  phase  1  clinical  trials  (n=20  for  each  trial,  half  of  which  were  vaccinated  with  CPG  7909‐ containing vaccines for each vaccine trial) of the blood stage malaria vaccine candidates,  apical  membrane  antigen  1‐combination  1  (AMA1‐C1)  and  merozoite  surface  protein  1 42 ‐combination  1  (MSP1 42 ‐C1).    Participants  were  healthy  adults  age  18–50.  Exclusion  criteria  included  prior  malaria  infection,  recent  or  planned  travel  to  a  malaria  endemic  area, recent use of malaria prophylaxis, and pre‐existing autoimmune disease. Subjects  were  required  to  be  in  good  general  health,  without  known  significant  medical  conditions  or  significant  medical  history,  and  were  re quired  to  have  normal  results  for  screening  laboratories:  complete  blood  count,  alanine  aminotransferase  (ALT),  and  creatinine; no serologic evidence of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or human immunodeficiency  virus  infection;  and  negative  anti‐double  stranded  DNA  (dsDNA)  as  a  marker  for  autoimmune  disease.  Urine  pregnancy  testing  was  performed  at  screening  as  well  as  prior to each vaccination for females.   2.2.2 U.S. blood bank samples  Venous bl ood samples from healthy U.S. adult blood bank donors (n=10) were analyzed  as controls.  Travel histories for these U.S. adults were not available, but prior exposure  to Pf is unlikely.   

Full document contains 221 pages
Abstract: Immunity to Plasmodium falciparum (Pf ), the most deadly agent of malaria, is only acquired after years of repeated infections and appears to wane rapidly without ongoing exposure. Antibodies (Abs) are central to malaria immunity, yet little is known about the B-cell biology that underlies Pf -specific humoral immunity. To address this gap in our knowledge we carried out a year-long prospective study of the acquisition and maintenance of long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs) and memory B cells (MBCs) in 225 individuals aged two to twenty-five years in Mali, in an area of intense seasonal transmission. Using protein microarrays containing approximately 25% of the Pf proteome we determined that Pf -specific Abs were acquired only gradually, in a stepwise fashion over years of Pf exposure. Pf -specific Ab levels were significantly boosted each year during the transmission season but the majority of these Abs were short lived and were lost over the subsequent six month period of no transmission. Thus, we observed only an incremental increase in stable Ab levels each year, presumably reflecting the slow acquisition of LLPCs. The acquisition Pf -specific MBCs mirrored the slow step-wise acquisition of LLPCs. This slow acquisition of Pf -specific LLPCs and MBCs was in sharp contrast to that of tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific LLPCs and MBCs that were rapidly acquired and stably maintained following a single vaccination in individuals in this cohort. In addition to the development of normal MBCs we observed an expansion of atypical MBCs that are phenotypically similar to hyporesponsive FCRL4 + cells described in HIV-infected individuals. Atypical MBC expansion correlated with cumulative exposure to Pf , and with persistent asymptomatic Pf -infection in children, suggesting that the parasite may play a role in driving the expansion of atypical MBCs. Collectively, these observations provide a rare glimpse into the process of the acquisition of human B cell memory in response to infection and provide evidence for a selective deficit in the generation of Pf -specific LLPCs and MBCs during malaria. Future studies will address the mechanisms underlying the slow acquisition of LLPCs and MBCs and the generation and function of atypical MBCs.