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Spiritual and strategic leadership in pastoral ministry

ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, 2011
Dissertation
Author: Pedro P Magalhaes
Abstract:
To serve Christ and his Church constitutes not only a great privilege, but also a big responsibility. The faithful accomplishment of the sacred pastoral calling will honor God, bring health to the church, and capacitate the church in its missionary task as well. Since pastoral ministry deals with the people of God, the purpose of this study was to provide a practical help to pastors in the spiritual and strategic leadership field in the local church where they are serving. The literature review focuses on the biblical function of leaders appointed by Christ for the building up of his Church. Leaders are responsible for the growth of God`s people, guiding them in the service of ministry. In addition, the literature review examines the theological foundations for the retreat seminars that provided tools for the accomplishment of the spiritual and strategic leadership tasks. The findings of this study demonstrate that a rigorous observation and practice of spiritual and strategic leadership make Christian leaders more efficient in their pastoral ministry.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

LIST OF TABLES

................................ ................................ ................................ ............

vii

LIST OF FIGURES

................................ ................................ ................................ .........

viii

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

................................ ................................ ................................ .

ix

CHAPTER 1 PROBLEM

................................ ................................ ................................ .... 1

Introduction

................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 1

Purpose

................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 2

Research Questions

................................ ................................ ................................ .. 2

Research Question #1

................................ ................................ .................. 2

Research Question #2

................................ ................................ .................. 2

Research Question #3

................................ ................................ .................. 2

Definition of Terms ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 2

Strategic Leadership ................................ ................................ ..................... 3

Spiritual Leadership

................................ ................................ ..................... 3

Ministry Intervention

................................ ................................ ............................... 3

Context

................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 4

Methodology

................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 5

Parti cipants

................................ ................................ ................................ ... 5

Instrumentation

................................ ................................ ............................ 5

Variables

................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 6

Data Collection

................................ ................................ ............................ 6

Data Analysis

................................ ................................ ............................... 7

iv

Generalizability

................................ ................................ ............................ 7

Theological Foundation

................................ ................................ ........................... 7

Overview

................................ ................................ ................................ ................ 10

CHAPTER 2 LITERATURE

................................ ................................ ............................. 11

Biblical Foundation for Spiritual and Strategic Leadership Training

.................... 11

Spiritual and Strategic Leaders hip and the Work of Serving

.................... 13

Spiritual and Strategic Leadership and Maturing of the Church

............... 13

Spiritual and Strategic Leadership as a Means of Doctrinal Protection

for the Church

................................ ................................ ................ 18

Theological Foundations for the Spiritual Retreats Seminars

............................... 20

Healthy Leaders and Healthy Churches

................................ ..................... 23

Christlike Ministry as the Main Model for Spiritual and

Strategic Leadership ................................ ................................ ....... 23

Spiritual and Strategic Leadership and the Work of the Holy Spirit

......... 28

Spiritual and Strategic Leadership within the Christian Community

........ 32

Str ategic and Spiritual Leadership and Changes

................................ ....... 45

Research Design ................................ ................................ ................................ .... 51

Summary

................................ ................................ ................................ ................ 52

CHAPTER 3 METHODOLOGY

................................ ................................ ...................... 54

Problem and Purpose

................................ ................................ ............................. 54

Research Questions

................................ ................................ ................................ 55

Research Question #1

................................ ................................ ................ 55

Research Question #2

................................ ................................ ................ 56

Research Question #3

................................ ................................ ................ 56

v

Population and Participants ................................ ................................ .................... 57

Desig n of the Study

................................ ................................ ................................ 58

Instrumentation

................................ ................................ .......................... 58

Variables

................................ ................................ ................................ .... 59

Reliability and Validity

................................ ................................ .............. 60

Data Collection

................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 60

Data Analysis

................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 61

Ethical Procedures

................................ ................................ ................................ . 62

CHAPTER 4 FINDINGS

................................ ................................ ................................ ... 6 3

Participants

................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 6 4

Research Question 1 Measurements

................................ ................................ ...... 6 5

Results of the Pretest on Spiritual Leadership

................................ ........... 6 5

Observations on the Pretest Results concerning Spiritual Leadership

....... 67

Results of the Pretest on Strategic Leadership

................................ ........... 6 8

Observations on the Pretest Results concerning Strategic Leadership

...... 70

Research Question 2 Measurements

................................ ................................ ...... 71

Results of the Posttest on Spiritual Leadership ................................ .......... 72

Results of the Posttest on Strategic Leadership

................................ ......... 74

Research Question 3 Measurements

................................ ................................ ...... 7 6

The Awakening of Disciplines in Spiritual Life and Ministry

.................. 7 7

Fellowship Time with the Pastor Participants

................................ ........... 7 7

Teaching about Team Work

................................ ................................ ....... 7 8

Tea ching about Vision and Planning, Making Changes, and Pastoral Ministry Endeavors

................................ ................................ ....... 79

vi

Summary of Major Findings

................................ ................................ .................. 8 0

CHAPTER 5

DISCUSSION

................................ ................................ .............................. 8 1

Major Findings

................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 8 1

A Healthy Pastoral Ministry Characterized by the Kind of Relationship with God ................................ ................................ ......................... 8 2

Pastors Working

on their Ministry in Order to Keep it Fresh and Avoid Stagnation

................................ ................................ ...................... 8 5

Successful Ministries Building an Environment for Team Work

.............. 8 6

Strategic Leadership Helpful and Needed in Order to Succeed in Pastoral Ministry

................................ ................................ .......................... 8 9

Implication of the Findings

................................ ................................ .................... 9 1

Limita tions of the Study ................................ ................................ ......................... 9 2

Unexpected Observations

................................ ................................ ...................... 9 3

Recommendations

................................ ................................ ................................ .. 9 4

Postscript

................................ ................................ ................................ ................ 9 5

APPENDIXES

A. Leadership Retreats Program

................................ ................................ ............ 9 7

B. Auto Evaluation Questionnaire on Spiritual and Strategic Leadership

............. 9 8

C. Reflective Personal Field Interviews on Spiritual an d Strategic Leadership

.. 1 0 3

D .

Informed Consent

................................ ................................ ............................ 10 4

WORKS CITED

................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 10 6

vii

LIST OF TABLES

Page

Table 4.1. Pre Test Average Results on Spiritual Leadership

................................ ........... 67

Table 4.2 .

Pre Test Average Results on Strategic Leadership

................................ ........... 70

Table 4.3 .

Pre and Post Tests Average Re sults on Spiritual Leadership

........................... 7 3

Table 4.4 .

Pre and Post Tests Average Results on Strategic Leadership

........................... 7 6

Table 4.5 .

Results on the Two Personal Field Interviews

................................ .................. 8 0

viii

FIGURES

Page

Figur e 2.1. Flow of Communication

................................ ................................ .................. 35

ix

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

My heart is abundant in gratitude to the Holy and Blessed Trinity, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, for the immense mercy and grace showed to me during these doctoral studies. Glory be to God!

My deepest gratitude goes to my wife Carla and my children Pedrito and Dani el, for their patience in my absence, and for the support given all the time during my studies.

I wish to thank the Beeson International Program staff for the wonderful ministry they have developed with international students, specifically the 2007 cohort . They have done a great job!

In addition, I am so thankful to my mentor Dr. Brian Russell for the support, guidance, and insights during the dissertation writing process.

To the Methodists pastors in Paraguay that participated in the project, my sincer e gratitude for the opportunity to learn from you. At the same time, I am glad to contribute to your ministry through the leadership retreats we had.

Magalhães

1

CHAPTER 1

PROBLEM

Introduction

One of the greatest challenges in pastoral ministry is related to leader ship. Spiritual and strategic leadership must be taken into account if a minister is to succeed in ministry. I was approached once by a pastor friend who shared with me his difficulty organizing himself so that his ministry would flow as smoothly as he wan ted. The most difficult part, he shared, was working strategically and getting people committed to a pre established plan. He even found himself struggling to follow his own projected agenda.

As I have been ministering among the local pastors of the Metho dist Church in Paraguay, I have noticed that spiritual and strategic leadership is a topic needing to be studied and developed in order to elicit better outcomes in their leadership tasks. In fact, many of these local pastors have not been able to develop their ministry well and this deficiency has affected their spiritual life and leadership. They have not had significant outcomes that could contribute to the growth of their local churches. Many of the pastors have stagnated and have not been able to strat egize in a new way, incurring the error of keeping the same methods and repeating the same programs and church activities.

A renewing and innovative ministry is characterized by the style of leadership one chooses to develop, which contributes to the mini ster staying focused on their calling and achievement in ministry. Spiritual and strategic leadership are important tools by which a leader can stay

new and fresh in their ministry — for a leader avoid stagnation in ministry

is

indispensable. When ministers lose their inspiration and excitement, they will easily

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2

lose their aspiration of doing something extraordinary, and as a result they will lose their quality and efficiency in ministry.

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to measure the changes in the

un derstanding and practice of strategic and spiritual leadership among the pastors of the Paraguayan Methodist Church who attended the three leadership retreats.

Research Questions

The following resea rch questions guided this study.

Research Question #1

Wh at were the levels of understanding and practice of strategic and spiritual leadership among the pastors of the Paraguayan Methodist Church before attending the three leadership retreats?

Research Question #2

What were the levels of understanding and pra ctice of strategic and spiritual leadership among the pastors of the Paraguayan Methodist Church after attending the three leadership retreats?

Research Question #3

What aspects of the three retreat seminars had the greatest impact on the observed changes ?

Definition of Terms

The following terms are defined in this study.

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3

Strategic Leadership

Firstly , the term strategic leadership

is related to the task of planning strategies, wisely choosing right paths, and making changes whenever is necessary. Secondly ,

in strategic leadership, the relationship with others, training, trusting, and empowering are important areas to develop. A leader is a person that must have the ability to encourage and guide followers in the accomplishment of the team goals without the loss of one ‘ s individuality. Thirdly , strategic leadership deals with vision. Leaders that do not have a clear vision of what is expected and do not plan strategically the operation of their ministry, so easily will lose their focus. Planning is the key to

putting a leader in motion and to giving direction to achieve significant outcomes.

Spiritual Leadership

The term spiritual leadership

is used in regards to the pastoral task of leading others to reach their potential and use it for God ‘ s kingdom extensio n. In applying this term to the pastoral ministry, I emphasize the importance of (1) keeping the health of spiritual and inner life that will always draw them closer to God in sane conscience; (2) deal ing

with spiritual and moral integrity, their life rela ted to others; and, (3) overcom ing

the fears, frustrations, and stresses in the pastoral leadership ministry.

Ministry Intervention

The purpose of this study was to complete

a ministry - intervention project in which I would be working with thirteen pastors in three retreat seminars. I conducted a series of seminars featuring spiritual and strategic leadership in ministry. During the seminars I applied a pretest and posttest. The pretest was used in the first retreat seminar and the posttest was employed in t he last retreat.

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Context

This research project was conducted in the largest context of Paraguay, my mission field. Paraguay, for many years, was governed by a dictatorship regime. The regime was overturned twenty - one years ago. Since then, the entire nati on and culture have undergone a deep transformation. The actual party government is completely new. For more than forty years ,

only one party governed the country. The elections that took place in 2009 brought several changes in the political administratio n. Needless to say, Paraguay is in a process of changes and adaptations that will affect its

culture and the ministry of the church as well.

I chose to study pastors from the Methodist Church where I have served since 1990. The Methodist Church in Paraguay

was started in 1988 by a lay leader, a lawyer from Londrina, Brazil. He invited a native Paraguayan pastor ministering in Brazil to move back to Paraguay to help in the starting process of planting that church. The church was soon established, and in 1996

was accepted as part of the Methodist World Council, eight years after its inception.

M y study was done among local pastors that belong to two out of the five Districts of the Methodist Church in Paraguay (M. C. P . ). Eleven

of these pastors are graduates

of the Methodist Bible Institute (M. B. I.), a three year program of study. The M. B. I. classes are held once a month for one intensive week. Four of the pastors have had more than ten years in ministry; the other nine have served between three to eight years. Four

of the pastors are presently studying to earn their degree in theology from the Evangelical University of Paraguay.

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Methodology

This project was a mixed - method explanatory research design tool. I applied pre - and post - auto - evaluative questionna ires, and two reflective personal interviews. The questionnaire‘s content I

used for the pretest and post test were related to spiritual and strategic leadership in the practice of ministry. After the third seminar, the results of this inquiry were used for

building a planning strategy to keep the quality and efficiency in ministry.

Participants

The selected participants for this study were the thirtee n pastors from two out of five d istricts, the Central and Chaco District s, of the M. P. C. Three out of thes e thirteen pastors that have finished the Methodist Bible Institute and another one that came from another church denomination, are in the process of attaining a college degree in theology. Of

the remainder , eight have been students in the Bible Institute and have a certificate of theology, and another pastor came from an independent church to be part of the Methodist pastoral staff. The reason I chose to work only with pastors of two districts was due to the economical and logistical circumstances of trave ling and the high expenses of receiving a large number of participants in the retreat seminars. The two mentioned districts are geographically close to each other and are what facilitated the communication and travelling to the gathering place where the re treat seminars were held.

Instrumentation

I used the sam e questionnaire twice, as a pre test and posttest, to gain information. The pr e test was used in the first retreat seminar before starting the lectures. The posttest

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6

was used in the last retreat semina r. The questionnaire had thirt y questions to answer on a four - point scale as follows: 4 — strongly agree, 3 — a gree, 2 — d isagree, and 1 — strongly disagree. I kept the data in individualized folders. The questions related to the practice of strategic and spiritua l leadership ministry and were divided according to the following areas of Christian life and min istry: inner and spiritual life

and ministry life. For the follow - up, the participants were challenged to apply the instruction and insights gained during the three retreat seminars.

Variables

The independent variable of this project was the seminars‘ teachings about spiritual and strategic leadership during the three retreats. The dependent variable was the changes in understanding and practice of strategic an d spiritual leadership among the pastors of the Paraguayan Methodist Church who attended the three leadership retreats.

Data Collection

The dat a was collected through the pre test, posttest, and two reflective personal field interviews. The follow - up was c omprised of

the learning experiences and insights gained during the leadership retreats combined with the practice of the contents in their ministry life after the retreats. All the data, including the pretest and post test completed during the retreats, an d the two interviews,

was kept in individualized folders. In addition, I used an extra form in the follow - up process on which I classified the different areas tested where the pastors would need to focus in order to attain better results and efficiency in their ministries.

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Data Analysis

The quantitative data collected in the pretest informed me about the spiritual and strategic leadership of the pastors prior to the retreat seminars. The analysis familiarized me with how they had been developing their mini stry in their churches — how they planned activities, made decisions, shared responsibilities, empowered others, cast vision, and how evaluation was done. In addition, the data revealed the depth of their spiritual lives — how they developed their devotional t ime related to prayer, fasting, and Bible study. The collected data from the posttest provided information about those areas where improvements were made. I was able to analyze the outcomes and see the reasons for achievement or failure in the practice of what was taught in the first seminar.

Generalizability

This study specifically related to training pastors and leaders for the church. While the goal was to help pastors be more effective in the leadership tasks of ministry, the main focus was not on chur ch growth. Regarding discipleship, the theories and practices of this study may become an important equipping tool of a spiritual and strategic leadership program. Although this study was limited to the pastors o f only two districts of the M . C.

P. , it may

be developed and used among the pastors from the other districts. In addition, this study may be helpful to other churches and denominations with the same need of strategic and spiritual leadership training for their pastors.

Theological Foundation

The s tudy of spiritual leadership is closely related to the ministry and life of the church. In fact, the effectiveness and health of church growth bends forward to the characteristics and capacities of its leaders. The church as a divine

institution is formed

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8

by human beings bought not by perishable things but by the blood of Christ (1 Pe t . 1:18 - 19). According to Paul, the Church is the temple of God indwelt by the Holy Spirit (1

Cor. 3:16), the pillar and foundation of the truth (1 Tim. 3:15). Therefore, the C hurch is not a matter of human affairs, but God ‘ s.

According to Matthew 16:18, Jesus is the builder of the Church. He started his ministry by calling disciples to follow him ,

and through them he would establish a plan to take his message to all the nation s (Matt. 4:18 - 22; 9:35 - 11:1; 28:16 - 20). During his life - time he proclaimed the kingdom of God as ― a present realm of blessing ‖

(Ladd 68 ) ,

and

the signs of God ‘ s presence were manifested in his teaching, healing, feeding the hungry, casting out demons, and proclaiming the good news (Mark 1:32 - 34). After dying on the cross ,

offering himself as the sacrifice for the sin of the whole world, he was raised again from the grave and crowned with power and authority ,

― far above all rule and authority, power and domi nion, and every title that can be given, not only in the present age but also in the one to come; he sits at the ―right hand of God in the heavenly realms‖ (Eph. 1:21 - 22

NVI ). However, the

missional aspect of this passage is in the following verses that st ate, ― And God placed all things under his feet and appointed him to be head over everything for the church, which is his body, the fullness of him who fills everything in every way ‖

(Eph. 2:22 - 23). Therefore, Christ is present and active in this world toda y and his visible manifestation is through the Church, which is his body, in the power of the Holy Spirit.

The Holy Spirit was sent after Jesus ‘

ascension and glorification in accordance with what he announced before dying on the cross (John 14:14 - 31). The

purpose of the Holy Spirit is to fill and empower the church for its mission in the world. He first works

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9

on the church and then through the church ( Cantalamessa 282). The arrival of the Holy Spirit on Pentecost

Day, as Gunter Krallmann states , ― was a rev olutionizing experience for those gathered, because it furnished them with the multifaceted and inexhaustible divine adequacy which they needed to pursue their calling according to the will of God ‖

(200).

In addition, the Holy Spirit will inspire and guide

Christian leaders into an effective ministry. As part of his ascension and glorification, Jesus gave some to be apostles, evangelists, pastors, and teachers to prepare God ‘ s people for works of service (Eph. 4:11 - 12). Thus, leadership over the church is e stablished by Jesus himself and the purpose of these leaders is to prepare and build up the people of God for mission. In fact, leaders and churches are invited to be part of the mission of God. Stephen Seamands says, mission ― is not essentially a human ac tivity undertaken by the church and its leaders out of obligation to the Great Commission, gratitude for what God has done for us, and the desperate plight of the world, it is God ‘ s own mission in which we are invited to participate ‖

(161). Therefore, the Christian community is a ― priestly community ‖

(Stevens 174).

The health and effectiveness of the church in its mission is directly related to the health and effectiveness of its leaders. The pastor is responsible for guiding the church strategically to rea ch God ‘ s purpose and vision. In addition, Christian leadership requires the leader to inspire, train, and take others to the service of the kingdom enthusiastically. In fact, good leaders are ― capable of getting followers to go above and beyond ‗ the call o f duty ‘‖

(Hughes, Ginnet, and Curphy 368).

Spiritual and strategic leadership enable the leader to deal with change when necessary to a chieve better outcomes:

― The definition of neurotic management is to

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10

continue to do the same thing but expect a differen t result ‖

(Hughes, Ginnet, and Curphy 164).

In other words, pastors must change their attitudes and actions if they want to change their outcomes. Thus, leadership, in order to be effective, must develop the ability to create and execute changes. Interesti ngly, Lee Roy Beach presents the idea of evolutionary and revolutionary vision as the two modes of cultural change. He says that, ―evolutionary vision sees the future as a natural evolution of the present‖ (56). The organization is moving ahead, making cha nges only to improve what has been set in the vision. Beach says that revolutionary vision ―sees the future as a profound departure from the present, usually as a result of existing or looming crises‖ (57). In conclusion, this

revolutionary vision will pre vent the stagnation of leaders in their leadership, which certainly will undermine their ministry.

Overview

Chapter 2 reviews literature associated with strategic and spiritual leadership, its development, theology of ministry in leadership, and strategic

abilities for effectiveness in ministry. Chapter 3 presents the methodology. Chapter 4 details the outcomes of the study. Chapter 5 provides a summary of the conclusions derived from the interpretation of the data and applications of the conclusions.

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11

CH APTER 2

LITERATURE

Biblical Foundation for Spiritual and Strategic Leadership Training

Jesus is God ‘ s

agent of reconciliation through his sacrifice on the cross (Col. 1:20). In the resurrection, God invested power in Christ

by

raising him from the dead and

exalting him in a privileged position over all rule, power, and dominion, and every title in the present and future (Eph. 1:19 - 21). In fact, ― after he had provided purification for sins, he sat down at the right hand of the majesty in heaven ‖

(Heb. 1:3). However, the important good news after Jesus ‘

exaltation is that God appointed him as the head of the C hurch, which is his body (Eph. 1:22). Now, the plan of redemption is shared with the church as the body of Christ.

Before rising up to heaven, he promis ed the resource for the church ‘ s missionary task s — the presence and power of the Holy Spirit. The geography of the mission was also determined, ― in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria and to the end of the earth ‖

(Acts 1:8). N ow, through the efforts of J ews and Gentiles after the Pentecost, the g ospel would spread from Jerusalem to the circumference, around the world (Neill 20).

In the book of

Acts, the ministry of the church in Jerusalem, and Paul‘s missionary trips, the delimitation of Acts 1:8 is reac hed: chapters

1 to 8:3, witness in Jerusalem; chapters 8:4 to 9:43, witness to Judea and Samaria; and chapters 10 to 28, witness to the end of earth.

The success of Paul ‘ s ministry was related to his network team, and to constantly striving to reach additi onal places (Rom. 15:20). He concentrated his missionary work in towns and cities, reaching the secular civilization and Jewish communities through their

Magalhães

12

synagogues. In order to spread the message through a prepared team, he established centers for teachin g and communication with an incredible result: ― This went on for two years, so that all the Jews and Greeks who lived in the province of Asia heard the word of the Lord ‖

(Acts 19:10).

The effectiveness of the church as a representative of Christ in this w orld depends on the efficiency of those that have been assigned by Christ as its leaders. The purpose of leaders in the church as the body of Christ is very well specified in Paul ‘ s letter to the Ephesians, chapter 4:

It was he who gave some to be apostles , some to be prophets, some to be evangelists, and some to be pastors and teachers, to prepare God ‘ s people for works of service, so that the body of Christ may be built up until we all reach unity in the faith and in the knowledge of the Son of God and be come mature, attaining to the whole measure of the fullness of Christ. Then we will no longer be infants, tossed back and forth by the waves, and blown here and there by every wind of teaching and by the cunning and craftiness of men in their deceitful sch eming. Instead, speaking the truth in love, we will in all things grow up into him who is the Head, that is, Christ. From him the whole body, joined and held together by every supporting ligament, grows and builds itself up in love, as each part does its w ork. (Eph. 4:11 - 16)

The church ‘ s health and success in its mission relates

directly to the health of its leaders. The mission of a leader in the individual aspect is to inspire, train, and take others into the service of the kingdom enthusiastically, lead ing them to fulfill their calling. Simultaneously, in the corporative aspect, leaders are responsible to guide their followers to accomplish the established goals of the group.

The following are areas in which leaders of the church must work in order to br ing the church, as the body of Christ, into the service of ministry, making Christ present and acting in the world today.

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Spiritual and Strategic Leadership and the Work of Serving

According to the Ephesians letter, the function of the leaders appointed b y Christ is for building up his body, the church:

― to prepare God ‘ s people for works of service, so that the body of Christ may be built up ‖

(Eph. 4:12). O bserving the commas, pastors can recognize three important functional elements

of leadership ministri es in the church: (1) the equipping of the saints ,

(2) a servant work ministry, and, (3) the construction of Christ‘s body (Barth 478).

The word katartismon , which

appears only here , comes from the verb katartizein , and is a term that implies healing. The

fundamental idea is to equip

or to furnish , setting convenient conditions in what, whether something, or someone, should be (Barclay 156; Henry 1682).

Full document contains 124 pages
Abstract: To serve Christ and his Church constitutes not only a great privilege, but also a big responsibility. The faithful accomplishment of the sacred pastoral calling will honor God, bring health to the church, and capacitate the church in its missionary task as well. Since pastoral ministry deals with the people of God, the purpose of this study was to provide a practical help to pastors in the spiritual and strategic leadership field in the local church where they are serving. The literature review focuses on the biblical function of leaders appointed by Christ for the building up of his Church. Leaders are responsible for the growth of God`s people, guiding them in the service of ministry. In addition, the literature review examines the theological foundations for the retreat seminars that provided tools for the accomplishment of the spiritual and strategic leadership tasks. The findings of this study demonstrate that a rigorous observation and practice of spiritual and strategic leadership make Christian leaders more efficient in their pastoral ministry.