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An evaluation of English as a foreign language textbooks for secondary schools in Angola

ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, 2009
Dissertation
Author: Simao Henriques
Abstract:
The objective of the present study was to analyze, evaluate, and critique the content of the currently used Angola Secondary Schools EFL textbooks on the basis of current theories of foreign language curriculum, and to determine how well these textbooks enable teachers to effectively teach English in their classrooms. This evaluation and analysis were conducted by performing a content analysis of the format and the content of the textbooks (reading passages, comprehension questions, exercises for vocabulary learning, and points of grammar). The Angola Secondary Schools employ two textbooks: One for Grade 7 and another one for Grade 8. Both textbooks were designed by the Ministry of Education of Angola under the National Institute for the Development of Education's supervision, and printed in its latest edition by Norprint Artes Graficas, in Portugal in 1996. For the data collection, a checklist was applied to the two Angolan EFL textbooks. The checklist was adapted from the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). A focus group, composed of six doctoral students in the field of English Language Teaching, used the checklist for evaluating the two textbooks and therein, obtaining the results. On this basis, the author analyzed, and subsequently, discussed the results. Among the limitations of this study are that it cannot be generalized to all the Angolan educational institutions since a number of private institutions use their own textbooks. In addition, the ACTFL's Standards used in the content analysis of this study were not created within a cross-cultural perspectives, and so it maybe difficult to say weather the ACTFL's Standards capture all the necessary components of such an analysis, especially when comes to issues of cultural awareness. Based on the results of this study, and on the current theories of curriculum, the two Angolan EFL textbooks were considered to be inappropriate for achieving the goals set forth by the Angolan Institute for the Development of Education. The two textbooks failed to comply with most criteria contained in the checklist. It is suggested that these two textbooks be replaced to accommodate the teachers' current practice in the classrooms. To this end, it is recommended that the Angolan authorities, in creating new EFL textbooks, follow the guidelines described from this study.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PROLOGUE………………………………………………………..……ii

ACKNOLEDGEMENTS …………………………………...…………. iii

ABSTRACT…………...………………………………………………....v

TABLE OF CONTENTS…………………………...………………......vii Page CHAPTER ONE: Introduction………………………………...…………………………….1

Purpose of the Study ………………………………………….....….10 Contribution of the Study ………………………………………........12 Research Questions ……………..…………………………………..13 Limitations of the study ......................................................................13

Summary ……...……………………………...……………………13

CHAPTER TWO: Literature Review…………...………….…………..15

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Curriculum Trends, Views, and Perspectives …….…...………………..15 Theories of Foreign Language Learning and Teaching ………...………..21

Foreign Language Learning ………………..…………..…….………23

Foreign Language Teaching …………………...……….…….………27 Principles of Language Course Design …………………..……………31 Content Analysis ………………...……….…………...……….……37 Textbooks Theory... …………………...…..……………….……….40

Principles of English as a Second Language Textbook Selection …...…….41

Summary ………………...……………...…………………………44

CHAPTER THREE: Methodology………………......……..…………..46 Study Design ………………………...………….……………..…...46 Research Questions ………………………...……………………….47 The textbooks Description ……………….……...……………...……47

English Reader for Grade 7 ……...…………………..………………48

English Reader for Grade 8 …………………….....…………………48 Framework of Evaluation ...…………………………………………

49 Rationale for the Checklist Design …………………….…......……….52

The Checklist Composition …………………..……………………...56

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Data Collection ………….…………………………………………59 Face Validity ………………………..……………………………..60

Piloting Study ……………………...……………………….………63 Focus Group Proceedings …………………...…………………….…66

Table 1: Focus Group Features ……….………………...…………….68 Summary ………………...………………………………………...69

CHAPTER FOUR: Results………………………………..……………70 Focus group Findings (Research Question 1) …………………………..70

Grade 7 Findings ……………………………………………………70

Grade 8 Findings ……………………………………………………79

Survey Results (Research Question 2) ………………………...……....88

Summary ………………...……………………………….………..89

CHAPTER FIVE: Conclusion…………..…..…................…………….91 Interpretation and Discussion of the Results …….…………….……….91

Research Question 1 …………………………………...……………91

Research Question 2 (Survey) …………..…………...……………...110 Conclusion and Recommendations ………………………….……….111

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References…………………….………………………………………120

Appendices………………………………………………………...…..127

Appendix A: English Reader Grade 7 Sample ……..…..…...….…..….128 A ppendix B: English Reader Grade 8 Sample ……..……………...…..141 Appendix C: The Checklist for the Textbooks Evaluation ……….....…..156 Appendix D : The Consent Form ………………………………...…..160 Appendix E: The Cover Letter addressed to the EFL experts …….…......162 Appendix F: Oman Grade 8A Textbook Sample …………………..…..163 Appendix G: The Survey for the Focus Group (Checklist Reliability) .......170 Appendix H: The Piloting Study Results ………...….………………..171 Appendix I : The Focus Group Findings Samples (Grade 7 and Grade 8 …184

Appendix J: Table 2 and Table 3 (The Results Synthesis) ..…………….195

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CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION

Introduction Angola is a Nation located on the southwestern Atlantic coast of Africa. The official language in Angola is Portuguese, a language inherited from the Portuguese colonization. Angola shares borders with African English-speaking countries such as Namibia and Zambia. Angola is influenced by other African countries where English is an official language, such as Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland, South Africa and Zimbabwe, members of the Commonwealths (evolving from the former British Commonwealth). Namibia and Zambia are also member countries of the Commonwealth. All these countries, including Angola, make a community called SADC (Southern African Development Community). It is easy then to realize that, English literacy has become a big priority in Angola. Commerce with other African countries, where English is the official language, and the opening to the outside world, as in the case of cooperation with the United States of America, makes English literacy one of the government’s top priority issues. The American Embassy in Luanda, the capital city, created an organization called “Center for Cultural Affairs,” with the objective of teaching the English language and exchanging the cultural concerns between Angola and the United States of America.

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The goal of this study was to evaluate, analyze, and critique the Angolan secondary schools “English as a Foreign Language” textbook content by comparing it against the background of current theories of second and foreign language learning. Another goal of this study was to determine how well these textbooks enable teachers to effectively operate in their classrooms. Angolan schools employ two textbooks for teaching the English language: “English Reader for Grade 7” and “English Reader for Grade 8.” Those instruments are published by the Ministry of Education of the Republic of Angola. The last time they were revised and printed was in 1996. The two English Readers textbooks have been designed using a dialogue format, following the tenets of the Audiolingual Method . The Audio-lingual Method is a behavioral approach in which a foreign language is put into patterned dialogues and drills. The objective of this approach is to develop the second language (L2) through repetitious training. Correct answers are reinforced by the teacher (Brown 2000). Learners do not get opportunities to be active and they are not involved in the topics of the lessons. According to Gower (1983), Taylor et al, (2000) the English textbook should be designed in such a way that learners can use the language creatively, and also the learners can be involved in the lessons. The English textbook for Grade 7 contains one hundred twenty four pages of dialogues, except for the first sixteen pages that contain pictures for students’ oral activities. The English Reader for Grade 8 has ninety-eight pages in which only seven pages are actual reading passages. Of these seven reading passages, only one passage in unit 1 contains comprehension questions, vocabulary exploration,

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and grammatical exercises. These textbooks are predominantly embedded with grammar within dialogues.

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) in its program “British Council Teaching English” in March 2007 makes comparison between the traditional approach and the more holistic communicative approach. This Corporation affirms that although the traditional approach aims to have students produce formally correct sentences, it focuses on the form of expressions (dialogues or pre-arranged pieces of language) rather than in content, and tends to be teacher-centered, (a characteristic common in the Angolan system that is reflected in the EFL textbook, as well). A better approach more commonly accepted in today’s L2 classrooms is the Communicative Language Teaching Approach (CLTA), which is student-centered. The CLTA focuses on the natural language learning process by concentrating on the content rather than form, focuses on communication, selects on the basis of whatever language items the learner needs to know, and then, most importantly, resembles the natural language learning process by concentrating on the content/meaning of the expression rather than the form. The main points to be considered for the evaluation and analysis of the two Angolan EFL textbooks were the textbooks content and formats. Format is the general arrangement in a constant form that a textbook has; for instance, in one chapter the reader can see a reading passage, comprehension questions, grammar, and vocabulary. In the following chapter these same elements might be found in the same sequence, and sometimes followed by their recycled knowledge or revisions.

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A focus group was set up with the objective of evaluating the two Angolan EFL textbooks. The focus group proceeded with the evaluation, using as a unique tool, a checklist. The focus group read the lessons to get the general idea and afterward checked the contents according to the criteria from the checklist. The focus group was requested to evaluate the two Angolan textbooks without any further details about the textbooks’ features. This procedure was observed as a way of avoiding any bias. The researcher’s impartiality towards focus group’s members was very important to insure an unbiased view in this study. The format followed in this study is that of content analysis. Some of the objectives of content analysis are to analyze information, or content, which may be any document, written or oral, according to Neuman (1994). On the other hand, Krippendorff (1980) states that when applying content analysis, a researcher can make inference and identify specific characteristic of messages. Content analysis can be directed to reading passages, grammar points, vocabulary, and also the semantic aspects of a text. The conditions for teaching EFL have always been a factor that influences teachers’ dependence on textbooks in the target language to provide learners with organized content and as a resource for studying the grammar. But the emphasis in teaching a foreign language includes also the oral aspects of the language including pronunciation and production of syntactically correct sentences (Francis, 1995). In Angola, the EFL curriculum for secondary level is represented by the students’ covering and assimilation of the two English textbooks content (grade 7 and

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grade 8 English Readers) and their ability to communicate, according to the goals set up by the National Institute for the Development of Education (INDE) at the Ministry of Education. These goals are national and apply to all secondary schools. When the students leave the basic level, they are expected to have attained a functional level of English before they go to the next stages (Medium Level Schools, which is the equivalent to High Schools in the United States, and Professional schools). Once they are at these stages, they are expected to communicate in English, and be able to use the language for academic purposes. Muhigirwa (2005) states that, “The high objective of English textbooks in the African reality, with special regard to Congo, once Zaire, is to get students to be able to communicate through interaction.” French is the official language in Congo, thus English is a foreign language. The same situation pertains for the Angolan reality. Angolan reality in this sense is reflected in the need of the students to learn English language and be able to communicate. Textbooks are the main resource for teachers to deliver their teaching to the students. Some teachers use supplementary material, such as tape-recorder, flash- cards, and realia. It is expected that by the end of the program students will be able to speak, read, write, and overall, to communicate with these minimal resources. Francis (1995) states that, Textbooks developed for EFL are organized based on historical principles that provide support for the method. The method implies the use of techniques and instructional

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methods designed to facilitate language learning. The methods provide the learner and teacher with materials and techniques that will secure a successful language learning outcome. Within the context of foreign language education, an instructional method typically provides a textbook, a teacher’s manual, student’s book, and sometimes a student’s workbook (p. 8). Francis further notes that EFL textbooks are organized following a general pattern: a typical chapter would include the following components: Chapter opener (possibly a reading passage), vocabulary and structural exercises, and comprehension questions based upon the reading passage. Other aspects of the chapter may often include cultural explanations and additional isolated language drills. Analyzing the content of English textbooks for the Angolan situation is important because teachers rely on textbooks to operate in classroom settings. The textbook is a tool for teachers to deliver their teaching, and, on the other hand, is a tool for students to follow the teacher's activity in the classrooms. Herlihy (1992) points out that, “The evidence is clear and overwhelming that textbooks and other print materials are a major part of the teaching-learning situation. For a number of reasons, students are provided with this basic tool in all of their classes” (p. 11). For EFL contexts, in general, textbooks are the main and reliable instrument for the teachers’ and the learners’ activities. For the African situation in particular, as found in Angola, textbooks represent the ultimate resource for schools.

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Yi (1999) says that, “When one looks at textbooks, one expects to find units, length of units, presentation, practice, objective of the unit, and skills” (p.23). A unit may be defined as the instructional content from a book to be provided by a teacher to the students. The four skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) must be put together in order to nurture the learner with integral learning. Yi (1999) adds that textbooks should follow a format in the following way: in each chapter, students may see a reading passage, reading comprehension, exercises (matching words, game for vocabulary acquisition, gap-filling exercises), together with methodological guidance. Additionally, at the beginning of each chapter, there is the title and the aim of the lesson so that students will get the first impression of or information on what they can expect to learn. This also enables teachers to focus on their activities. Textbooks containing, for example, reading passages, comprehension exercises, and

drills, would be more convenient for engaging learners in the activities, according to Francis (1995). Teachers should also have the option to apply a variety

of effective teaching methods. Often, some discrepancies are discovered between the curriculum and the students’ expectations; frequently, the curriculum does not approach either the students’ needs or the community. Easton (2002) states that, Several aspects of culturally embedded curriculum arise from those ideas about culture, community, and learning

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or enquire community. First, the culture must be articulated. Second, curriculum derives from culture. Third, the curriculum must be manageable for it to be effective within the culture. Forth, the culture itself is part of the curriculum and must be taught (p.44). The need for a strong commitment to the development of cultural understanding within the language program is clear, particularly in the light of recent developments both nationally and internationally (Hadley, 2001). The valuing of cultural diversity is a continuing priority in education because students learn to live in an increasingly interdependent world. Also according to Hadley, the integration of culture and language teaching can contribute significantly to humanistic knowledge. The era of globalization entails three main facets: economic, political, and cultural (Sifakis N. & Sourgari, 2003). Muhigirwa (2005) points out that, “The historical development of the teaching of EFL in Congo reveals that over the years much emphasis has been put in the acquisition of language skills through the grammar translation approach and an audio- lingual approach (ALM)” (p. 3). While the former provides and elaborates on grammar and tends to promote the use of the mother tongue to facilitate the learning, the latter fosters imitation of the native speaker through the use of repetitive drills and audio-visual materials. The case that is described by Muhigirwa is similar to that found in Angola where some teachers use these traditional ways of language teaching. Grammar

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translation (GT) is the translation of the English language rules into mother tongue so as to help students to better understand the way the English language functions. Hurley (2000) notes that students who are taught through the GT method know the rule of a language but cannot produce it. The use of GT does not promote communication. McLaughlin (1998), based on Krashen’s “Five Hypotheses about Second Language Acquisition,” with particular reference to the Monitor Hypothesis, contends that optimal users typically are able to use grammar rules in writing, but often may not use them in speaking. To this end, the learner gets theoretical, technical accuracy to the detriment of real communication, in actual, practical usage. The format of this study is as follows: Chapter One presents the introduction, wherein the main objective is addressed. Relevant information about the Nation of Angola is also introduced. Additionally, this chapter addresses the reasons for conducting the proposed research, as well as its contribution for improved education in Angola. Two research questions are stated that this study answered. Finally, potential limitations of this study are frankly presented and discussed. Chapter Two addresses theories, views and perspectives of curriculum design. Ideas that this chapter addresses are when the curriculum is designed, the students’ needs should be taken into consideration. The curriculum should be learner-centered rather than teacher-centered. This chapter also devotes some lines to theories of second/foreign language learning and teaching. Basic principles for language course design constitute another point worthy to consider. Finally textbook theorie s are also addressed.

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Chapter Three is concerned with investigative methodology. This study is qualitative, using textbooks for evaluation (textbooks content and structure). The textbook description is presented, followed by the design of the data collection instrument. Then the data is presented in details for further analysis and discussions. Finally the content analysis is also defined. Chapter Four presents the focus group results in detail. All results are interpreted and discussed in chapter five including conclusion and recommendations.

Purpose of the Study The purpose of this study is to evaluate, analyze, and critique the Angolan EFL textbooks for secondary schools on the basis of current theories of foreign language curriculum, and to determine how well these textbooks enable teachers to effectively operate in their classrooms. A checklist was employed as the tool for gathering data in this study and a focus group was created with the objective of evaluating the two Angolan EFL textbooks using this checklist. The checklist was adapted from those designed by Dougill (1987), Van Els et al (1984), Shrum & Glisan (2005), Mieckley (2005) following the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Standards. ACTFL is the only national organization dedicated to the improvement of the teaching and learning of all languages at all levels of instruction. It is an organization with more than nine

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thousand foreign languages educators and administrators from elementary through graduate education as well as in government and industry. One of the ACTFL’s objectives is to define content standards i.e., what students should know and be able to accomplish in their foreign language experience. ACTFL has a visionary document that has been used by teachers, administrators, and curriculum developers at both and local levels to begin to improve foreign language education in schools. The five standards from which the checklist used in this study draws its content are: Communication

Standard 1. Students engage in conversations, provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions. Students understand and interpret written and spoken language on a variety of topics. Students present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners or readers on a variety of topics. Cultures

Standard 2. Students demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the practice and perspectives of the culture studied. Students demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the products and perspectives of the culture studied.

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Connections

Standard 3. Students reinforce and further their knowledge of other disciplines through the foreign language. Students acquire information and recognize viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures Comparisons

Standard 4. Students demonstrate understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of the language studied and their own. Students demonstrate understanding of the concept of culture through comparisons of the cultures studied and their own. Communities

Standard 5. Students use the language both within and beyond the school setting. Students show evidence of being life-long learners by using the language for personal enjoyment and enrichment.

Contribution of the Study Having visited the ideas and theories of other researchers and scholars, this study addresses longtime due changes and improvement in the textbooks policy in Angola. The researcher hopes this study will be a vehicle for bringing innovation to Angola by contributing to the Angolan English education system. It is fully hoped that, from the recommendations emanated from this study, the Ministry of Education of Angola will embrace changes in the EFL curriculum.

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Research Questions In the course of his study, the researcher will set out to address the following research questions: 1. To what extent do the two Angolan “English as a Foreign Language” textbooks meet the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages’ Standards? 2. How well does the evaluation instrument used in this study -- Standards-based checklist -- help evaluate the areas of strengths or weaknesses in the two Angolan EFL textbooks?

Limitations of the study 1. This study cannot be generalized to all Angolan educational institutions as it is recognized that a number of private institutions employ their own materials. 2. This study is only applied to public secondary schools EFL textbooks. 3. The ACTFL’s Standards have not been field-tested with a variety of EFL textbooks. 4. The ACTFL’ Standards employed in the content analysis of this study were not created with the Angolan reality into consideration.

Summary Angola is a Nation located in the Southwestern part of Africa on the Atlantic coast. Angola is an affiliate of the SADC (Southern Africa Development Community) composed mainly of African English-speaking countries; therefore, English language

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has become a significant priority for those members of the community that are not English-speaking, mainly Angola and Congo (Portuguese and French speaking respectively). Chapter Two will review the current literature concerning curriculum, trends, perspectives, and theories of foreign/second language learning and teaching. Additionally, principles of language course design will be addressed, and finally, theory of textbooks and principles of foreign language textbook selection will also be addressed.

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CHAPTER TWO

THE LITERATURE REVIEW

This chapter will address trends, views, and perspectives of curriculum. With regard to curriculum, it will present definitions, theories, and general ideas. In addition, this chapter will present theories about second language learning and teaching, and basic ideas about language course work design. Finally, theories about textbooks will also be presented.

Curriculum Trends, Views, and Perspectives According to the American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (1978), the word “curriculum” means all the course of study offered by an educational institution and a particular course of study, often in a special field. The word curriculum comes from the Latin word currere , which means “to run.” Nowadays the term “curriculum” is viewed somewhat in more technical ways, reflecting different tendencies and interpretations, according to cultures, perspectives and views. Some scholars consider curriculum as the content of instructional program considered therefore as prescriptive approaches to be followed by those responsible for the instruction. Walker (2003) defines curriculum as “A particular way of ordering content and purposes for teaching and learning in schools. Content is what teachers and students pay attention to when they are teaching and learning” (p. 5).

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For Tyler (1949), content can be described as a list of school subjects, subdivided in topics, themes, concepts, or works to be covered. Purposes on the other hand, are the reasons for doing something; in this case the reason for teaching certain content. Tyler (1949) says that a particular school may have broad and general reasons, for example: 1. The objective of our school is to transmit the culture, social and technical experiences, so that students will be endowed with knowledge which will help them to be able to improve and intervene in the society. 2. The objective of our school is to foster in students the notion of good citizenry, prepared to face a democratic society. As far as school and classroom practices are concerned, the purposes are transformed into objectives or plans as the teacher’s guidance in the classrooms. At this point, objectives are more specific and confined to specific areas, which teachers expect students to learn. Walker (2003) points out that, Such curriculum documents coordinate teaching and learning in vital ways. They help the teachers keep in mind the big picture of what should be taught and learned over months and years and keep in track of where they are in relation to planned programs at any given time (p. 8). In addition to curriculum being a prescriptive line as is customary, it is also a series of teachers’ and schools’ guides. Curriculum is to some extent a teacher’s

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personal document through which he/she orients the classroom task. Schools as such, take curriculum as the guidance and system of control to be exercised over teachers and students as evaluated by means of outcomes. Any adoption of a new policy, or a new methodology, is the result of social constraint. According to Armstrong (1989), there are two factors that make curriculum specialists operate: social and cultural environment. These two factors impose certain constraints or influences. For curriculum specialists, the influence may be direct and indirect. The first influence comes from the authorities and the second is the influence which comes from the social and cultural environment that pushes curriculum specialists to embrace some decisions and to disavow others. School is the center of the attention for curriculum work. So when the curriculum is designed, the community’s culture and the students’ tendencies should be considered, otherwise, the content will not meet expectations of the learners and of the community. Easton (2003) expresses the idea as follows, The culture of a school through, somewhat abstract and intangible influences everything else about it, including curriculum. At its best, culture is a focus, a true compass pointing North, that helps everything else in the school make sense. Even a school that cannot articulate its culture has one, but that unarticulated but operative culture affects everything else about that school (p. 40).

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Culture is the reflection of life and learning experiences that schools turn into instructional programs and transmit to students. It should be in the schools that the community’s values are emphasized and the students’ tendencies treated. It is worthy to consider, therefore, that if the school should represent the community, then curriculum should emanate from the culture, because the culture comes alongside with the community itself. Easton (2002) still contends that, “Customizing curriculum to the culture of the school does not mean that an outside curriculum (imposed by a district, a state, or the federal government) must be rejected.” If the curriculum represents the community and derives from- and promotes- the schools culture, then it must be manageable by everyone within the learning community: students, parents, teachers, school and district administrators, and all needs to be understood; it needs to make sense. Educating incorporates the faithful transference of social values, as well as technical skills, according to the current social trends or social standards. In this way schools represent transforming forces aimed at molding students according to the social requirements. Dewey (1919) considers school as a “microcosm of the society.” Society means people living together, working towards common lines, in a common spirit, and with reference to common prospects. It is, therefore, common that from the family educational settings, students attain limited knowledge, a knowledge which tends to be parochial. Seen from another perspective, schools are more devoted to reaching across a wide range of concerns, teaching all sorts of important skills that

Full document contains 209 pages
Abstract: The objective of the present study was to analyze, evaluate, and critique the content of the currently used Angola Secondary Schools EFL textbooks on the basis of current theories of foreign language curriculum, and to determine how well these textbooks enable teachers to effectively teach English in their classrooms. This evaluation and analysis were conducted by performing a content analysis of the format and the content of the textbooks (reading passages, comprehension questions, exercises for vocabulary learning, and points of grammar). The Angola Secondary Schools employ two textbooks: One for Grade 7 and another one for Grade 8. Both textbooks were designed by the Ministry of Education of Angola under the National Institute for the Development of Education's supervision, and printed in its latest edition by Norprint Artes Graficas, in Portugal in 1996. For the data collection, a checklist was applied to the two Angolan EFL textbooks. The checklist was adapted from the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). A focus group, composed of six doctoral students in the field of English Language Teaching, used the checklist for evaluating the two textbooks and therein, obtaining the results. On this basis, the author analyzed, and subsequently, discussed the results. Among the limitations of this study are that it cannot be generalized to all the Angolan educational institutions since a number of private institutions use their own textbooks. In addition, the ACTFL's Standards used in the content analysis of this study were not created within a cross-cultural perspectives, and so it maybe difficult to say weather the ACTFL's Standards capture all the necessary components of such an analysis, especially when comes to issues of cultural awareness. Based on the results of this study, and on the current theories of curriculum, the two Angolan EFL textbooks were considered to be inappropriate for achieving the goals set forth by the Angolan Institute for the Development of Education. The two textbooks failed to comply with most criteria contained in the checklist. It is suggested that these two textbooks be replaced to accommodate the teachers' current practice in the classrooms. To this end, it is recommended that the Angolan authorities, in creating new EFL textbooks, follow the guidelines described from this study.