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Nonvascular Plants

The first land plants were the liverworts, hornworts, and mosses. These nonvascular land plants first grew more than 400 million years ago. Although these three [types of plants] are able to grow on land and are more complex than most algae, they lack the specialized tissues for transporting water and food that are found in higher plants, and they do not make seeds.

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Types

  • TONGUEWORT - GREEN(2 Of 2)
  • LIVERWORT(2 Of 2)
  • Bryophyte
    Member of the Bryophyta, a division of the plant kingdom containing three classes: the Hepaticae (liverwort), Musci (moss), and Anthocerotae (hornwort). Bryophytes are generally small, low-growing, terrestrial plants with no... more
  • Hornwort
    Nonvascular plant (with no 'veins' to carry water and food), related to the liverworts and mosses. Hornworts are found in warm climates, growing on moist shaded soil. (Class Anthocerotae, order Bryophyta.) more
  • Liverwort
    The liverworts look like flat green leaves with rounded lobes. They grow in wet places—on rocks, logs, or damp earth. Their name comes from their shape, which in some varieties looks like that of the human liver. The suffix “wort” comes from... more
  • Chapter 5.10: Lower Plants
    The very first plants lived in water and consisted of just one cell. These cells contained chlorophyll and made sugars by photosynthesis, so the plants were green. They are known as green algae and they still exist (although they are not... more
  • Moss
    Among the earliest plants to become adapted to living on dry land, the mosses were the first green plants to stand erect. They existed as early as the Permian Period, which began 280,000,000 years ago and lasted for 55,000,000 years, and... more
  • Water Plants
    From microscopic plankton to towering palm trees, many plants or plantlike organisms make their home in rivers and lakes. Water is seldom in short supply, but getting enough light, air, and nutrients can be a challenge. more

Parts & Processes

  • Chapter 5.10: Lower Plants
  • Water Pollution; Aquatic bryophytes are useful as bioindicators of freshwater quality
    "Aquatic bryophytes have been studied and used as biological indicators of water quality for more than 30 years. A bibliographic review describing research studies carried out on this topic is presented here; this work is based on... more
  • Epidermis
    Outermost layer of cells on an organism's body. In plants and many invertebrates such as insects, it consists of a single layer of cells. In vertebrates, it consists of several layers of cells. more
  • The Green Algal Underground: Evolutionary Secrets of Desert Cells
    Microscopic, unicellular, free-living green algae are found in desert microbiotic crusts worldwide. Although morphologically simple, green algae in desert crusts have recently been found to be extraordinarily diverse, with... more
  • Soggy April makes moss merry; 'They like it cool and damp' and they're mating like mad
    For most of us, the idea of a romantic setting is a sunny, sandy, tropical beach. more
  • Stoma
    In botany, a pore (tiny hole) in the epidermis (outer layer of tissue) of a plant. There are lots of these holes, usually in the lower surface of the leaf. A leaf contains several layers of tissue. The outer layer is the epidermis and is only one... more
  • Would you trust a bryophyte for directions? A field exercise for determining the distribution of moss on trees
    Every introductory biology course preaches the importance of scientific method, but often students do not have the opportunity to develop and test scientific questions in those very courses. For example, published lab manuals for the... more

All About Algae

  • "Most ocean plants are not true plants at all. They are algae--simple, plantlike organisms that lack proper stems, leaves, or roots. But like the true plants on land, they trap sunlight and use it to make food." Workers try to clean green algae in Taihu lake in Wuxi, in China...
  • "Most ocean plants are not true plants at all. They are algae--simple, plantlike organisms that lack proper stems, leaves, or roots. But like the true plants on land, they trap sunlight and use it to make food." Ocean Plants
    Most ocean plants are not true plants at all. They are algae - simple, plantlike organisms that lack proper stems, leaves, or roots. But like the true plants on land, they trap sunlight and use it to make food. more
  • "Most ocean plants are not true plants at all. They are algae--simple, plantlike organisms that lack proper stems, leaves, or roots. But like the true plants on land, they trap sunlight and use it to make food." Ocean Plants
    Most ocean plants are not true plants at all. They are algae - simple, plantlike organisms that lack proper stems, leaves, or roots. But like the true plants on land, they trap sunlight and use it to make food. more

What About Fungus?

  • LETHARIA VULPINA
  • Fungus
    Fungi (singular, fungus) are everywhere in the environment—in the soil; in lakes, rivers, and the seas; in the air (some are so tiny that they are carried by currents of wind or on the bodies of insects); and in and on plants and animals,... more
  • fungus
    Fungi (singular, fungus) are everywhere in the environment—in the soil; in lakes, rivers, and the seas; in the air (some are so tiny that they are carried by currents of wind or on the bodies of insects); and in and on plants and animals,... more